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Courses for Comparative Literature

Unify Course Listings

Courses of Instruction

CPLT BC 3001x Introduction to Comparative Literature

Introduction to the study of literature from a comparative and cross-disciplinary perspective. Readings will be selected to promote reflection on such topics as the relation of literature to the other arts; nationalism and literature; international literary movements; post-colonial literature; gender and literature; and issues of authorship, influence, originality, and intertextuality. - B. O'Keeffe
BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).. BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)..
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CPLT BC3001
CPLT
3001
02326
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
323 MILBANK HALL
B. O'Keeffe 56 [ More Info ]

CPLT BC 3110x Introduction to Translation Studies

Introduction to the major theories and methods of translation in the Western tradition, along with practical work in translating. Topics include translation in the context of postcolonialism, globalization and immigration, the role of translators in war and zones of conflict, gender and translation, the importance of translation to contemporary writers. - P. Connor
Prerequisites: Completion of the Language Requirement or equivalent. BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).. BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)..
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CPLT BC3110
CPLT
3110
09674
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
405 MILBANK HALL
P. Connor 117 [ More Info ]

CPLS BC 3120x or y Poetics of the Mouth

Explores the imagery of eating, drinking, spitting, choking, sucking (and other unmentionables) in relation to insults and excessive behaviors. Readings from Greek poetry (e.g., Homer, Aristophanes) to modern theory (e.g., Kristeva, Powers of Horror, Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World), including modern novels and films.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CPLS BC 3123x or y Friend or Foe? World Literature and the Question of Justice

With an emphasis on equality and social justice, this course examines and compares significant 19th c./20th c. literary approaches to friendship as intermediary between individualism and communal life. Discussion of culturally formed concepts and attitudes in modern or postcolonial settings. Reading of Dickens, Hesse, Woolf, Ocampo, Puig, Fugard, Emerson, Derrida, Rawls. - E. Grimm
Prerequisites: CPLS BC3001 Intro to Comp. Lit.; completion of intermediate language courses. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CPLS BC 3140y Europe Imagined: Images of the New Europe in 20th-Century Literature

Compares the diverse images of Europe in 20th-century literature, with an emphasis on the forces of integration and division that shape cultural identity in the areas of travel writings and transculturation/cosmopolitanism; mnemonic narratives and constructions of the past; borderland stories and the cultural politics of translation. Readings include M. Kundera, S. Rushdie, H. Boell, C. Toibin and others. - E. Grimm
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Cultures in Comparison (CUL).. BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CPLS BC 3142y The Spanish Civil War in Literature and the Visual Arts

The Spanish Civil War (1936-39), which culminated with the beginning of Francisco Franco's long dictatorship, foreshadowed the WWII European conflict. It generated unprecedented foreign involvement, as well texts and images by artists from both within and outside Spain - from film (documentary and fictional), through painting (Picasso), to narrative and nonfiction.

- W. Rios-Font
BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CPLS BC 3160y Tragic Bodies

This course will focus on embodiment in ancient and modern drama as well as in film, television, and performance art, including plays by Sophocles, Shakespeare, and Beckett; films such as "Rosemary's Baby" and "The Limits of Control"; and performances by artists such as Karen Finley and Marina Abromovic. We will explore the provocations, theatricality, and shock aesthetics of such concepts as Artaud's "Theater of Cruelty" and Kristeva's "powers of horror," as well as Adorno's ideas about terror and the sublime. - N. Worman
3 points

CPLS BC 3162x The Novella from Cervantes to Kafka

The novella, older than the novel, painstakingly crafted, links the worlds of ideas and fiction. The readings present the novella as a genre, tracing its progress from the 17th century to the 20th. Each text read in the comparative milieu, grants the reader access to the intellectual concerns of an era. - A. MacAdam
3 points

CPLS BC 3170y Translating Madness: The Sciences and Fictions of Pathology

Examines the discursive exchanges between fictional and scientific accounts of "madness," with an emphasis on how modern literature renders the new diagnostic discourse and how literary portrayals of "madness" were "translated back" into the diagnostic language of psychology. Discussions revolve around the "medical gaze" and its influence on the writers' literary style, motifs and technique; relevant questions concern interdisciplinary issues such as the relationship between genre and case study; hysteria and sexuality; gender construction and psychoanalysis. Readings include texts by Flaubert, Wilde, Daudet, Sacher-Masoch; excerpts from Freud, Charcot, Foucault, Deleuze; and visual documents. - M. Mimran
BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLEN V 3190x Aesthetics of the Grotesque

Examination of the grotesque in different cultural contexts from late Renaissance to the postmodern period comparing modes of transgression and excess in Western literature and film. Particular emphasis on exaggeration in style and on fantastic representations of the body, from the ornate and corpulent to the laconic and anorexic. Readings in Rabelais, Swift, Richardson, Poe, Gogol, Kafka, Meyrink, Pirandello, Greenaway, and M. Python. - E. Grimm
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CPLT V 3200 The Visual and Verbal Arts

Analysis and discussion of the relation of literature to painting, photography, and film. Emphasis on artistic and literary concepts concerning the visual dimension of narrative and poetic texts from Homer to Burroughs. Explores the role of description, illustration, and montage in realist and modern literature. - E. Grimm
BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).. BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART)..
3 points

CLSP BC 3215y The Colonial Encounter: Conquest, Landscape, and Subject in the Hispanic New World

This course will move across and over the geopolitical landscape of the Tudor and Habsburg Empires in Europe and the New World in order to explore and compare the diverse symbolic and political roles the colonial encounter had in the signification of the relationship between the subject and the landscape. - O. Betancor
Corequisites: Enrollment limited to 15. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CPLS BC 3510y Advanced Workshop in Translation

A deep immersion in the theory and practice of translation with a focus on translating into English. The first half of the course is devoted to discussing readings in the history of translation theory while translating brief practical exercises; in the second half, translation projects are submitted to the class for critical discussion. The foreign texts for these projects, chosen in consultation with the instructor, will be humanistic, not only literature as conventionally defined (prose fiction and poetry, memoir and travel writing), but also the gamut of text types in the human sciences, including philosophy, history, and ethnography. The aim is not just to translate, but to think deeply about translating, to develop writing practices by drawing on the resources of theory, past and present, and by examining translations written by professionals. Enrollment in this workshop is limited to 12 students. Admission into the class is by permission of the instructor. CPLT BC 3011 "Introduction to Translation Studies" is a recommended prerequisite, plus, normally, two advanced courses beyond the language requirement in the language from which you intend to translate. Preference will be given to seniors and to comparative literature majors. Please Email pconnor@barnard.edu by 19 November 2013 with the following information: your name, year of graduation, and major; a list of courses you have taken in the language from which you intend to translate; any other pertinent courses you have taken; a brief (max 300 word) statement explaining why you wish to take the workshop (this statement is not required if you have taken or are taking CPLT BC3110 Intro to Translation Studies). - P. Connor
Prerequisites: CPLT BC 3110 Introduction to Translation Studies is a recommended prerequisite.
4 points

CLIA V 3660y Mafia Movies: From Sicily to The Sopranos

Examines representations of the mafia in American and Italian film and literature. Special attention to questions of ethnic identity and immigration. Comparison of the different histories and myths of the mafia in the U.S. and Italy. Readings includes novels, historical studies, and film criticism. Limit 25 - N. Moe
BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: The Visual and Performing Arts (ART)..
3 points

CPLS V 3675x Mad Love

The history of irrational love as embodied in literary and non-literary texts throughout the Western tradition. Readings include the Bible, Greek, Roman, Medieval, and modern texts. - A. Mac Adam
BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)..
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CPLS V3675
CPLS
3675
07595
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
323 MILBANK HALL
A. Mac Adam 36 [ More Info ]

CPLS V 3950y Colloquium in Literary Theory

Examination of concepts and assumptions present in contemporary views of literature. Theory of meaning and interpretation (hermeneutics); questions of genre (with discussion of representative examples); a critical analysis of formalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, post-structuralist, Marxist, and feminist approaches to literature.
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 18.
4 points

CPLS BC 3997y Senior Seminar

Designed for students writing a senior thesis and doing advanced research on two central literary fields in the student's major. The course of study and reading material will be determined by the instructor(s) in consultation with students(s). - E. Grimm
4 points

CPLS BC 3999x and y Independent Research

Independent research, primarily for the senior essay, directed by a chosen faculty adviser and with the chair's permission. The senior seminar for majors writing senior essays will be taught in the Spring term.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
4 points

CLEN W 4011x Dostoevysky, Tolstoy, and the English Novel

Close reading of works by Dostoevsky, (Netochka Nezvanova; The Idiot, "A Gentle Creature") and Tolstoy (Childhood, Boyhood, Youth; "Family Happiness", Anna Karenina; "The Kreutzer Sonata") in conjunction with related English novels (Brontë 's Jane Eyre, Eliot's Middlemarch, Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway). No knowledge of Russian is required; all works read in English. - L. Knapp
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLEN W 4012x or y Russian, French and American Novels of Adultery

Adultery is a driving concern of the works read. Authors include Pushkin, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Chekhov; Lafayette, Flaubert; Hawthorne, Chopin. As we study the nineteenth-century novels that define the novel of adultery as a literary category, as well as some precursors and later offshoots, we articulate a morphology of the novel of adultery. We also focus on the narrative techniques used to represent the consciousness of the protagonists, in an effort to determine how the subject matter and the poetics of the novel of adultery interact.

No knowledge of Russian is required; all works read in English.

- L. Knapp
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

Cross-Listed Courses

Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures (Barnard)

W3630 Survey of Indian Literatures in Translation

East Asian Languages and Cultures

V3215 Korean Literature and Film

W4029 Colloquium on Major Works of Japanese Philosophy, Religion, and Literature

English (Barnard)

BC3136 Renaissance Epic

BC3158 Medieval Literature: Literatures of medieval Britain

BC3171 The Novel and Psychoanalysis

BC3187 American Writers and Their Foreign Counterparts

BC3190 Global Literature in English

BC3192 Exile and Estrangement in Global Literature

BC3194 Critical & Theoretical Perspectives on Literature: A History of Literary Theory & Criticism

BC3194 Critical & Theoretical Perspectives on Literature: Literary Theory

BC3194 Critical and Theoretical Perspectives on Literature: Psychoanalytic Approaches to Literature

BC3194 Critical and Theoretical Perspectives on Literature: Postmodern Texts and Theory

BC3810 Literary Approaches to the Bible

French (Barnard)

V3420 Introduction to French and Francophone Studies I

W3421 Introduction to French and Francophone Studies II

German (Barnard)

BC3224 Germany's Traveling Cultures

BC3225 Germany's Traveling Cultures

Linguistics

W3101 Introduction to Linguistics

Religion (Barnard)

V3512 The Bible and Its Interpreters

Religion

W4011 The Lotus Sutra in East Asian Buddhism

Spanish and Latin American Cultures (Barnard)

W3265 Latin American Literature in Translation

Theatre

V3141 Socialism/Communism in Performance

V3150 Western Theatre Traditions: Classic to Romantic

V3151 Western Theatre Traditions: Modern

V3166 Drama, Theatre, and Theory