Go to m.barnard.edu for the Mobile Barnard web app or download it from the App Store or Google Play.

Courses for Slavic

Unify Course Listings

Russian Language

RUSS V 1101x-V1102y First-year Russian, I and II

Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.
5 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS V1101
RUSS
1101
72674
001
MTuWTh 8:50a - 9:55a
709 HAMILTON HALL
M. Avila 13 [ More Info ]
RUSS
1101
62484
002
MTuWTh 11:40a - 12:45p
709 HAMILTON HALL
T. Davis 10 [ More Info ]
RUSS
1101
13153
003
MTuWTh 1:10p - 2:15p
709 HAMILTON HALL
S. Pinkham 9 [ More Info ]
RUSS
1101
70734
004
MTuWTh 2:40p - 3:45p
709 HAMILTON HALL
E. Traverse 4 [ More Info ]
RUSS
1101
15813
005
MTuWTh 6:10p - 7:30p
709 HAMILTON HALL
W. Hanlon 5 [ More Info ]

RUSS V 1103x-V1104y First-year Russian Grammar, I and II

Must be taken concurrently with RUSS V1101-V1102. - A. Smyslova
Corequisites: RUSS V1101-V1102 Not offered in 2014-2015.
1 point

RUSS V 1201x-V1202y Second-year Russian, I and II

Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review.
Prerequisites: RUSS V1102 or the equivalent.
5 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS V1201
RUSS
1201
62696
001
MTuWTh 8:50a - 9:55a
707 HAMILTON HALL
R. Jensen 12 / 14 [ More Info ]
RUSS
1201
15171
002
MTuWTh 11:40a - 12:45p
408 HAMILTON HALL
N. Kun 10 / 14 [ More Info ]
RUSS
1201
68968
003
MTuWTh 1:10p - 2:15p
707 HAMILTON HALL
N. Kun 13 / 14 [ More Info ]

RUSS V 3101x-V3102y Third-year Russian, I and II

Enrollment limited. Recommended for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Emphasis on conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes. Lectures. Papers and oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.
Prerequisites: RUSS V3101:RUSS 1202 or the equivalent and the instructor's permission. Prerequisite for V3102: Russian V3101 or the equivalent.
4 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS V3101
RUSS
3101
05440
001
MWF 1:10p - 2:25p
207 MILBANK HALL
A. Dvigubski 8 / 15 [ More Info ]
RUSS
3101
15645
002
MWF 10:10a - 11:25a
707 HAMILTON HALL
A. Smyslova 6 / 12 [ More Info ]

RUSS V 3430x-V3431y Russian for Heritage Speakers, I and II

This course is designed to help students who speak Russian at home, but have no or limited reading and writing skills to develop literary skills in Russian. Conducted in Russian.
Prerequisites: PREREQUISITES RUSS V3430 or instructor's permission.
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS V3430
RUSS
3430
74450
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
707 HAMILTON HALL
A. Smyslova 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

RUSS W 4333x-W4334y Fourth-year Russian, I and II

Either term may be taken separately. W4333: Systematic study of problems in Russian syntax; written exercises, translations into Russian, and compositions. W4334: Discussion of different styles and levels of language, including word usage and idiomatic expression; written exercises, analysis of texts, and compositions. Conducted entirely in Russian. - M. Kashper
Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.
4 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS W4333
RUSS
4333
08900
001
MWF 10:10a - 11:25a
501 MILBANK HALL
A. Dvigubski 8 [ More Info ]

RUSS W 4345y Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through History

This is a language course designed to meet the needs of those foreign learners of Russian as well as heritage speakers who want to further develop their reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills and be introduced to the history of Russia.
Prerequisites: Three years of Russian
3 points

RUSS W 4350x-W4351y Moving to Advanced-Plus: Language, Culture, Society in Russian Today

Eight semesters of college Russian and instructor's permission. The course is designed to provide advanced and highly-motivated undergraduate and graduate students of various majors with an opportunity to develop professional vocabulary and discourse devices that will help them to discuss their professional fields in Russian with fluency and accuracy. The course targets all four language competencies: speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as cultural understanding.. Conducted in Russian.
Prerequisites: Seven semesters of college Russian

RUSS W 4432 Contrastive Phonetics and Grammar of Russian and English

Comparative phonetic, intonational, and morphological structures of Russian and English, with special attention to typical problems for American speakers of Russian.
Prerequisites: RUSS W4334 or the equivalent and the instructor's permission.
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS W4432
RUSS
4432
22276
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
716A HAMILTON HALL
F. Miller 3 / 15 [ More Info ]

RUSS W 4433x Specific Problems in Mastering Russian

Prerequisite: four years of college Russian and instructor's permission. The Russian verb (basic stem system, aspect, locomotion); prefixes; temporal, spatial, and causal relationships; word order; word formation
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS W4433
RUSS
4433
69271
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
404 HAMILTON HALL
F. Miller 3 [ More Info ]

RUSS W 4434x Practical Stylistics [in Russian]

Focuses on theoretical matters of style and the stylistic conventions of Russian expository prose, for advanced students of Russian who wish to improve their writing skills. - I. Reyfman
Prerequisites: RUSS W4334 or the equivalent or the instructor's permission. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS G 4910x Literary Translation

Workshop in literary translation from Russian into English focusing on the practical problems of the craft. Each student submits a translation of a literary text for group study and criticism. The aim is to produce translations of publishable quality. - Ron Meyer
Prerequisites: Four years of college Russian or the equivalent.
4 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS G4910
RUSS
4910
75179
001
M 4:10p - 6:00p
1219 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
R. Meyer 6 [ More Info ]

Russian Literature and Culture (in English)

RUSS V 3220x Literature and Empire: The Reign of the Novel in Russia (19th Century) [In English]

Knowledge of Russian not required. Explores the aesthetic and formal developments in Russian prose, especially the rise of the monumental 19th-century novel, as one manifestation of a complex array of national and cultural aspirations, humanistic and imperialist ones alike. Works by Pushkin, Lermonotov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov.
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS V3220
RUSS
3220
26653
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
501 MILBANK HALL
E. Tyerman 26 [ More Info ]

RUSS V 3221y Literature & Revolution [In English]

Knowledge of Russian not required. Survey of Russian literature from symbolism to the culture of high Stalinism and post-Socialist realism of the 1960-70s, including major works by Andrei Bely, Blok, Olesha, Babel, Bulgakov, Platonov, Zoshchenko, Kharms, Kataev, Pasternak, Venedikt Erofeev.
3 points

RUSS V 3222y Tolstoy and Dostoevsky [In English]

Two epic novels, Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov, will be read along with selected shorter works. Other works by Tolstoy include his early Sebastopol Sketches, which changed the way war is represented in literature; Confession, which describes his spiritual crisis; the late stories "Kreutzer Sonata" and "Hadji Murad"; and essays on capital punishment and a visit to a slaughterhouse. Other works by Dostoevsky include his fictionalized account of life in Siberian prison camp, The House of the Dead; Notes from the Underground, his philosophical novella on free will, determinism, and love; "A Gentle Creature," a short story on the same themes; and selected essays from Diary of a Writer. The focus will be on close reading of the texts. Our aim will be to develop strategies for appreciating the structure and form, the powerful ideas, the engaging storylines, and the human interest in the writings of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. No knowledge of Russian is required. - L. Knapp
3 points

RUSS V 3223x Magical Mystery Tour: The Legacy of Old Rus' [In English]

Winston Churchill famously defined Russia as "a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma." This course aims at demystifying Russia by focusing on the core of its "otherness" in the eyes of the West: its religious culture. We will explore an array of texts, practices and pragmatic sites of Russian religious life across such traditional divides as medieval and modern, popular and elite, orthodox and heretical. Icons, liturgical rituals, illuminated manuscripts, magic amulets, religious sects, feasting and fasting, traveling practices from pilgrimages to tourism, political myths and literary mystification, decadent projects of life-creation, and the fervent anticipation of the End are all part of a tour that is as illuminating as it is fun. No knowledge of Russian is required
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS V 3228x Russian Literature & Culture in the New Millennium

Knowledge of Russian not required. Survey of Russian literature and culture from the late 1970s until today. Works by Petrushevskaya, Pelevin, Tolstaya, Sorokin, Ulitskaya, Senchin, Akunin, Rubinshtein, Prigov, Vasilenko and others. Literature, visual art, and film are examined in social and political context.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLRS V 3501y How to Tell a War Story: Narratives About War from Leo Tolstoy to the Present

The goal of this course is to use the literary study of war stories to address larger questions about war, peace, and fragility of life. As we examine how war has been depicted, memorialized, and critiqued in these written texts, we will ask how, in turn, these texts influence out understanding of war in human life.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS V 3595x Senior Seminar

A research and writing workshop designed to help students plan and execute a major research project, and communicate their ideas in a common scholarly language that crosses disciplinary boundaries. Content is determined by students' thesis topics, and includes general sessions on how to formulate a proposal and how to generate a bibliography. Students present the fruits of their research in class discussions, culminating in a full-length seminar presentation and the submission of the written thesis.
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS V3595
RUSS
3595
03342
001
Tu 4:10p - 6:00p
237 MILBANK HALL
E. Tyerman 4 [ More Info ]

RUSS W 4107x Russian Literature and Culture in the New Millennium

Survey of Russian literature and culture from the late 1970s until today. Works by Petrushevskaya, Pelevin, Tolstaya, Sorokin, Ulitskaya, Akunin, Rubinshtein, Prigov, Vasilenko, and others. Literature, visual art, and film are examined in social and political context. Knowledge of Russian not required.
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS W4107
RUSS
4107
22196
001
TuTh 11:40a - 12:55p
609 HAMILTON HALL
R. Borislavov 11 [ More Info ]

RUSS W 4309y Nineteenth -Century Narrative Dilemmas

This course will explore narrative strategies developed by Russian authors as they created a literary tradition that would change the world. Starting with Pushkin's first completed prose work, we will explore how narrative frames, structures, genre, and authorial choices contribute to textual explorations of identity, responsibility, love, violence and revenge. Texts covered will include: Pushkin's "Tales of Belkin," Lermontov's, "Hero of Our Time", Gogol's "The Diary of a Madman,"The Nose," and "The Overcoat," Dostoevsky's "The Double and Demons, Tolstoy's "War and Peace", and Leskov's "The Enchanted Wanderer." No knowledge of Russian required.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4451y The Cultural Cold War

This course will examine major developments in Soviet society after WWII through the prism of the Cold War. Organized thematically and chronologically, it will focus selectively on specific episodes of Soviet-American relations by drawing on a variety of media. Students will read, discuss and evaluate a broad range of primary and secondary sources and think critically about historical writing, the relationship bewtween art and politics, mass culture and propaganda, spy novels, memoirs and travelogues. Films by Sergi Eisenstein, Andrei Tarkovsky, Stanley Kubrick, and John Frankenheimer. Prose and poetry by Andrei Voznesensky, Viktor Pelevin, Svetlana Alexievich, Vasily Aksyonov, Viktor Nekrasov and others.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4452x Russian Modernism Through the Lens of Music

A historical survey of trends of Russian musical modernism in the context of Russian cultural history of the first half of the twentieth century. Works by Chaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Scriabin, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Mosolov, Shostakovich and Schnittke will be considered alongside notable events of contemporary literature, visual art, and aethetic theory. Knowledge of Russian not required.
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS W4452
RUSS
4452
61748
001
TuTh 6:10p - 7:25p
707 HAMILTON HALL
B. Gasparov 2 [ More Info ]

RUSS W 4676y Russian Art between East and West: The Search for National Identity

Aims to be more than a basic survey that starts with icons and ends with the early modernists. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, it aims to highlight how the various cultural transmissions interacted to produce, by the 1910s, an original national art that made an innovative contribution to world art. It discusses the development of art not only in terms of formal, aesthetic analysis, but also in the matrix of changing society, patronage system, economic life and quest for national identity. Several guest speakers will discuss the East-West problematic in their related fields-for example, in literature and ballet.

Some familiarity with Russian history and literature will be helpful, but not essential. Assigned readings in English. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

- Elizabeth Valkenier
3 points

Russian Literature and Culture (in Russian)

RUSS V 3319y Masterpieces of 19th Century Russian Literature

A close study, in the original, of representative works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Ostrovsky, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, leskov, and Chekhov.
3 points

RUSS V 3320y Masterpieces of 20th-Century Russian Literature

Close study, in the original, of representative works by Bely, Sologub, Pasternak, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Olesha, Mandel'stam, Akhmatova, Solzhenitsyn, Terts, and Brodsky.
Prerequisites: Native or near-native knowledge of Russian and the instructor's permission. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS V 3332x Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu: Scary Stories

Two years of college Russian or the instructor's permission. For non-native speakers of Russian. The course is devoted to the reading, analysis, and discussion of a number of Russian prose fiction works from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to apply their language skills to literature. It will teach students to read Russian literary texts as well as to talk and write about them. Its goal is, thus, twofold: to improve the students' linguistic skills and to introduce them to Russian literature and literary history. A close study in the original of the "scary stories" in Russian literature from the late eighteenth century. Conducted in Russian.
3 points

RUSS V 3333x Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu: Poor Liza, Poor Olga, Poor Me

For non-native speakers of Russian. The course is devoted to the reading, analysis, and discussion of a number of Russian prose fiction works from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to apply their language skills to literature. It will teach students to read Russian literary texts as well as to talk and write about them. Its goal is, thus, twofold: to improve the students' linguistic skills and to introduce them to Russian literature and literary history. In 2007-2008: A close study in the original of the "fallen woman" plot in Russian literature from the late eighteenth century. Conducted in Russian.
Prerequisites: Two years of college Russian or the instructor's permission. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 3997x-W3998y Supervised Individual Research
Prerequisites: Departmental permission.
2-4 points.

RUSS W 4014y Introduction to Russian Poetry and Poetics

An introduction to Russian poetry, through the study of selected texts of major poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, primarily: Pushkin, Lermontov, Pavlova, Tiutchev, Blok, Mandel'shtam, Akhmatova, Mayakovsky, Prigov and Brodsky. Classes devoted to the output of a single poet will be interspersed with classes that draw together the poems of different poets in order to show the reflexivity of the Russian poetic canon. These classes will be organized according either to types of poems or to shared themes. The course will teach the basics of verisification, poetic languages (sounds, tropes), and poetic forms. Classes in English; poetry read in Russian. - K. Lodge
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4200y Theater Workshop: Gogol's Revizor

The study and staging, in the original of a Russian play (Gogol's Revizor). Concentration on exploration of character and style through language, phonetics, detailed textual analysis, and oral presentation.

- M. Kashper
Prerequisites: Instructor's permission. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4331y Chteniia po russkoi literaturu: Turgenev

The course is devoted to reading shorter prose works by Ivan Turgenev. The reading list includes stories from his collection Sketches of a Hunter as well as such masterpieces as The Diary of a Superfluous Man, First Love, and Asia. Classes are conducted entirely in Russian.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4332y Chteniia po russkoi literaturu: Gogol

The course is devoted to reading shorter works by Nikolai Gogol, The syllabus includes selections from his collection Sketches of a Hunter as well as such masterpieces as the Diary of a Superfluous Man, First Love, and Asia. Classes are conducted entirely in Russian.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4338y Chteniia po russkoi literature: Voina i mir

The course is devoted to reading and discussing of Tolstoy's masterpiece. Classes are conducted entirely in Russian
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4339y Chteniia po russkoi literature: Pushkin

A survey of Alexander Pushkin's poetry and prose in the original. Emphasis on the emergence of a new figure of the Poet in Russin in the 1820-1830s. Linguistic analysis of the poetic texts (vocabulary, metrics, versification) will be combined with the study of Russian History and Culture as reflected in Pushkin's writings. - Irina Reyfman
Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian and the instructor's permission.
Not offered in 2014-2015.

3 points

RUSS W 4344x Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through History

In 2008-2009: A language course designed to meet the needs of those foreign learners of Russian as well as heritage speakers who want to develop further their reading, speaking, and writing skills and be introduced to the history of Russia. - F. Miller
Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian or the equivalent
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS W4344
RUSS
4344
66542
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
408 HAMILTON HALL
F. Miller 5 [ More Info ]

RUSS W 4346 Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Russian Folklore and the Folkloric Tradition

The purpose of this course is to acquaint structure with traditional folk beliefs that are part of Russian life today. Readings will include descriptions of character ritual folk beliefs as well as narratives about personal experiences concerning superstition, sorcery and the supernatural. Also included will be folktales that most Russians know and contemporary Russian folk narratives.
3 points

RUSS W 4348x Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through the Media

This course is designed to meet the needs of advanced students of Russian across several fields - the humanities, social sciences, law, arts, and others - who want to further develop their speech, comprehension, reading, and writing and be introduced to the contemporary Russian media. This addition to our series of courses in Advanced Russian through cultural content provides training for research and professional work in Russian.
Prerequisites: Three years of college Russian or the equivalent
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: RUSS W4348
RUSS
4348
16087
001
TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
709 HAMILTON HALL
I. Kun 4 / 15 [ More Info ]

RUSS W 4349y Chteniia po russkoi kul'ture: Advanced Russian Through Song

This is a content-based language course that is designed to develop students' ability to understand fluent Russian speech and express their opinions on various social and cultural topics in both oral and written form.
Prerequisites: Three Years of College Russian or the equivalent Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4354y Chteniia po Russkoi Literature: A Hero of Our Time and Other Superfluous People

This course focuses on the study and analysis of Mikhail Lermontov's, "A Her of Our Time" - one of the most influential Russian novels of the 19th century - in its broader social, artistic, and intellectual context. Students will trace the development of the so-called "superfluous man," a strikingly ubiquitous character type whose recurrent appearance throughout the broader history of Russian literature makes him one of the most recognizable national characters.
3 points

Czech Language and Literature

See also Czech courses in the section "Comparative Literature, Slavic" with the designator "CLCZ.

CZCH W 1101x-W1102y Elementary Czech, I and II

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year. - C. Harwood
4 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CZCH W1101
CZCH
1101
75947
001
TuThF 10:10a - 11:25a
406 HAMILTON HALL
C. Harwood 0 / 18 [ More Info ]

CZCH W 1201x-W1202y Intermediate Czech, I and II

Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.

- Christopher Harwood
Prerequisites: CZCH W1102 or the equivalent.
4 points
Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CZCH W1201
CZCH
1201
27942
001
TuThF 11:40a - 12:55p
406 HAMILTON HALL
C. Harwood 0 / 18 [ More Info ]

CZCH W 3997x-W3998y Supervised Individual Research

Prerequisite: Departmental permission. - Christopher Harwood
2-4 points.

CZCH W 4333x Readings in Czech Literature, I

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

- C. Harwood
Prerequisites: Two years of college Czech or the equivalent BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)..
3 points
Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CZCH W4333
CZCH
4333
19885
001
TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
406 HAMILTON HALL
C. Harwood 1 [ More Info ]

CZCH W 4334y Readings in Czech Literature, II

A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

- C. Harwood
Prerequisites: Two years of college Czech or the equivalent.
3 points

Polish Language and Literature

See also Polish courses in the section "Comparative Literature, Slavic" with the designator "CLPL.

POLI W 1101x-W1102y Elementary Polish, I and II

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.
4 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: POLI W1101
POLI
1101
67259
001
MWF 10:10a - 11:25a
408 HAMILTON HALL
A. Frajlich-Zajac 1 / 18 [ More Info ]

POLI W 1201x-W1202y Intermediate Polish, I and II

Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.
Prerequisites: POLI W1102 or the equivalent.
4 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: POLI W1201
POLI
1201
64631
001
MWF 1:10p - 2:25p
716A HAMILTON HALL
A. Frajlich-Zajac 3 / 18 [ More Info ]

POLI W 3997x-W3998y Supervised Individual Research
- Anna Frajlich-Zajac
Prerequisites: Departmental permission.
2-4 points.

CLPL W 4040y Mickiewicz

The Polish literary scene that in this particular period stretched from Moscow, Petersburg, and Odessa, to Vilna, Paris, Rome. The concept of exile, so central to Polish literature of the 19th-century and world literature of the 20th will be introduced and discussed. The course will offer the opportunity to see the new Romantic trend initially evolving from classicism, which it vigorously opposed and conquered. We will examine how the particular literary form - sonnet, ballad, epic poem and the romantic drama developed on the turf of the Polish language. Also we will see how such significant themes as madness, Romantic suicide, Romantic irony, and elements of Islam and Judaism manifested themselves in the masterpieces of Polish poetry. The perception of Polish Romanticism in other, especially Slavic, literatures will be discussed and a comparative approach encouraged.Most of the texts to be discussed were translated into the major European languages. Mickiewicz was enthusiastically translated into Russian by the major Russian poets of all times; students of Russian may read his works in its entirety in that language. The class will engage in a thorough analysis of the indicated texts; the students' contribution to the course based on general knowledge of the period, of genres, and/or other related phenomena is expected. - A. Frajlich-Zajac
3 points

CLPL G 4042x Bestsellers of Polish Literature

A study of the 20th-century Polish novel during its most invigorated, innovative inter-war period. A close study of the major works of Kuncewiczowa, Choromanski, Wittlin, Unilowski, Kurek, Iwaszkiewicz, Gombrowicz, and Schulz. The development of the Polish novel will be examined against the background of new trends in European literature, with emphasis on the usage of various narrative devices. Reading knowledge of Polish desirable but not required. Parallel reading lists are available in the original and in translation. - Anna Frajlich-Zajac
Not offered in 2014-2015.
4 points

POLI G 4049y Twentieth Century Polish Poetry

Students will be able to learn about the Polish literary scene and its dynamics and most of all read and analyze the most representative texts of the particular poets. The main goal of this course will be reading and comprehension of the text in original.
Prerequisites: Reading proficiency in Polish Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

POLI W 4101x-W4102y Advanced Polish, I and II

Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

- A. Frajlich-Zajac
Prerequisites: Two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission.
4 points
Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: POLI W4101
POLI
4101
24981
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
716A HAMILTON HALL
A. Frajlich-Zajac 1 / 18 [ More Info ]

CLPL W 4120x The Polish Short Story: in Comparative Text

This course will discuss what the short story is, when it appeared in the history of literature, and what makes it a unique genre. In the introductory part we will discuss in brief the most prominent and best known short stories of Boccaccio's "Decameron," related literature, and short stories by other authors who belong to the classical canon. We will distinguish three large categories: the short story based plot, the short story of character, and the descriptive short story. Assessment of the classical Polish short story and its canon.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLPL W 4300y Unbound and Post Dependent: The Polish Novel After 1989

This seminar is designed to offer an overview of Post-1989 Polish prose. The literary output of what is now called post-dependent literature demonstrates how political transformations influenced social and intellectual movements and transformed the narrative genre itself. The aesthetic and formal developments in Polish prose will be explored as a manifestation of a complex phenomenon bringing the reassessment of national myths, and cultural aspirations. Works by Dorota Maslowska, Andrzej Stasiuk, Pawel Huelle, Olga Tokarczuk, Magdalena Tulli and others will be read and discussed. Knowledge of Polish not required.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian Language and Literature

See also South Slavic courses in the section "Comparative Literature, Slavic" with the designator "CLSL."

BCRS W 1101x-W1102y Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, I and II

Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.
4 points

BCRS W 1201x-W1202y Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, I and II

Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students.
Prerequisites: BCRS W1102 or the equivalent.
3 points

CLSS W 3997x-W3998y Supervised individual instruction

- Radmila Gorup
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Not offered in 2014-2015.
2-4 points.

BCRS W 4002x (Dis)integration in Frames: Race, Ethnicity and gender Issues in Yugoslav and Post Yugoslav Cinemas

This course investigates the complex relationship between aesthetics and ideology in Yugoslav and post-Yugoslav cinema. Specifically, it examines the variety of ways in which race, ethnicity, gender inequality, and national identity are approached, constructed, promoted, or contested and critically dissected in film texts from the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) and its successor states (Bosnia, Croatia, Serbia, FYR Macedonia). The course has four thematic units and is organized chronologically.
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: BCRS W4002
BCRS
4002
99692
001
W 6:10p - 10:00p
716A HAMILTON HALL
A. Boskovic 7 [ More Info ]

BCRS W 4331x-W4332y Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, I and II

Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures. - R. Gorup
Prerequisites: BCRS 1202.
3 points

Ukrainian Language and Literature

UKRN W 1101x-W1102y Elementary Ukrainian, I and II

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

- A. Korzh
3 points
Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: UKRN W1101
UKRN
1101
26687
001
MWF 8:40a - 9:55a
716A HAMILTON HALL
Y. Shevchuk 2 / 18 [ More Info ]

UKRN W 1201x-W1202y Intermediate Ukrainian, I and II

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

- Yuri Shevchuk
Prerequisites: UKRN W1102 or the equivalent.
3 points
Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: UKRN W1201
UKRN
1201
21433
001
MWF 10:10a - 11:25a
716A HAMILTON HALL
Y. Shevchuk 3 / 18 [ More Info ]

UKRN W 3997x-W3998y Supervised Individual Research
Prerequisites: Departmental permission. Not offered in 2014-2015.
2-4 points.

UKRN W 4001x-W4002y Advanced Ukrainian, I and II

The course is for students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian. Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participles, gerunds, declension of numerals, and a more in-depth study of difficult subjects, such as verbal aspect and verbs of motion. The material is drawn from classical and contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media, and film. Taught almost exclusively in Ukrainian.

- Y. Shevchuk
Prerequisites: UKRN W1202 or the equivalent.
3 points
Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: UKRN W4001
UKRN
4001
73046
001
MW 2:40p - 3:55p
TBA
Y. Shevchuk 0 / 18 [ More Info ]

Film

Courses in the Film section are listed under the specific languages.

HNGR W 4050 The Hungarian New Wave: Cinema in Kadarist Hungary [In English]

Hungarian cinema, like film-making in Czechoslovakia, underwent a renaissance in the 1960's, but the Hungarian new wave continued to flourish in the 70's and film remained one of the most important art forms well into the 80's. This course examines the cultural, social and political context of representative Hungarian films of the Kadarist period, with special emphasis on the work of such internationally known filmmakers as Miklos Jancso, Karoly Makk, Marta Meszaros, and Istvan Szabo. In addition to a close analysis of individual films, discussion topics will include the "newness"of the new wave in both form and content (innovations in film language, cinematic impressionism, allegorical-parabolic forms, auteurism, etc.), the influence of Italian, French, German and American cinema, the relationship between film and literature, the role of film in the cultures of Communist Eastern Europe, the state of contemporary Hungarian cinema. The viewing of the films will be augmented by readings on Hungarian cinema, as well as of relevant Hungarian literary works.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4155y History of Russian & Soviet Film

History of Russian & Soviet Cinema. 3 pts. This course surveys developments in Russian film history and style from the prerevolutionary beginnings of cinema through the Soviet and post-Soviet experience. We will be studying both the aesthetic qualities of the films and their historical and cultural contexts. Students will be exposed to a wide range of visual media, including experimental films of the 1920s, films on Russia's experience of World War II, Soviet classics, late Soviet and contemporary Russian films. Readings will include theoretical articles and selections from Russian film history and criticism. All readings are in English and the films will be screened with English subtitles. - Rad Borislavov
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

Linguistics


SLLN G 4005x Introduction to Old Church Slavonic

An introduction to the structure of Old Church Slavonic followed by readings of texts, with attention to the cultural history of Church Slavonic and its texts. - A. Timberlake
3 points

Comparative Literature Slavic

SLCL W 3001x Slavic Cultures

The history of Slavic peoples - Russians, Czechs, Poles, Serbs, Croats, Ukrainians, Bulgarians - is rife with transformations, some voluntary, some imposed. Against the background of a schematic external history, this course examines how Slavic peoples have responded to and have represented these transformations in various modes: historical writing, hagiography, polemics, drama and fiction, folk poetry, music, visual art, and film. Activity ranges over lecture (for historical background) and discussion (of primary sources).
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: SLCL W3001
SLCL
3001
68364
001
MW 8:40a - 9:55a
717 HAMILTON HALL
A. Timberlake 57 / 87 [ More Info ]

CLRS V 3224x Nabokov

This course examines the writing (including major novels, short stories, essays and memoirs) of the Russian-American author Vladimir Nabokov. Special attention to literary politics and gamesmanship and the author's unique place within both the Russian and Anglo-American literary traditions. Knowledge of Russian not required.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLRS V 3300y Four Quixotes

The critics who dislike Don Quixote the novel far outnumber those who dislike Don Quixote the character. Some cast doubt on Cervantes as a literary craftsman, questioning the degree of prescience and self-consciousness that seems to make this seventeenth-century work "modern." The Philosopher and writer Miguel de Unamuno is the standard-bearer for those who argue that it is the character of Don Quixote - rather than author's writing style - that has made this work so fruitful. The classic translator of Cervantes into English, Samuel Putman, follows suit, citing the novel's myriad of mistakes and incongruities as evidence that its success is based on Don Quixote's charms. Even the most scathing Cervantes critic, Vladimir Nabokov, who found the novel "cruel and crude." found Don himself sympathetic.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLRS V 3301y Angry Young Decade: 1955 - 1965 In Russia, Poland, USA & England

This course will consider the literature and film of Russia, Poland, the USA and England during 1955-1965, focusing specifically on the phenomenon of literary movements of angry young writers rebelling against a stagnant tradition. We will also read various autobiographical accounts from writers who explain, from their insider's view, how the various movements started, how they influenced each other, and why and how they came to an end. The primary goal of this course is to acquaint students with literature they most likely have never encountered, and with films they may never have seen before, but which are essential components in the development of prose and cinema not only in the four countries of our studies, but across borders, oceans, and even decades.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLRS V 3302y Fairy Tales Reloaded: Witches, Werewolves, Fools, and Post-Modern Fiction

This course examines eastern European fairy tales against the background of western narrative traditions, and explores the role of this genre in postmodern literature. In the first half of the course we read fairy tales, paying close attention to internal structural relationships and their overall aesthetic, including their peculiar relationship to time, play with language, and openness to variation. In the second half we focus on the tales' contemporary reincarnations, and discuss why these stories become a particularly powerful medium for exploring central topics in postmodern fiction, such as representations of sex and violence.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLRS V 3304y How To Read Violence: The Literature of Power, Force and Brutality from 20th Century Russia and America

This course seeks to understand how authors and filmakers have mobilized the forms and devices of literature and film to communicate the experience of violence to their audiences.
3 points

CLSL W 4003y Central European Drama in the Twentieth Century

Focus will be on the often deceptive modernity of modern Central and East European theater and its reflection of the forces that shaped modern European society. It will be argued that the abstract, experimental drama of the twentieth-century avant-garde tradition seems less vital at the century's end than the mixed forms of Central and East European dramatists. - I. Sanders
BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT).. Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLSL W 4004x Introduction to Twentieth-Century Central European Fiction

This course introduces students to works of literature that offer a unique perspective on the tempestuous twentieth century, if only because these works for the most part were written in "minor" languages (Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Serbian), in countries long considered part of the European backwaters, whose people were not makers but victims of historyYet the authors of many of these works are today ranked among the masters of modern literature. Often hailing from highly stratisfied , conservative societies, many Eastern and Central European writers became daring literary innovators and experimenters. To the present day, writers from this "other" Europe try to escape history, official cultures, politics, and end up redefining them for their readers. We will be dealing with a disparate body of literature, varied both in form and content. But we will try to pinpoint subtle similarities, in tone and sensibility, and focus, too, on the more apparent preoccupation with certain themes that may be called characteristically Central European.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLRS W 4011x Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and the English Novel [in English]

A close reading of works by Dostoevsky (Netochka Nezvanova; The Idiot; "A Gentle Creature") and Tolstoy (Childhood, Boyhood, Youth; "Family Happiness"; Anna Karenina; "The Kreutzer Sonata") in conjunction with related English novels (Bronte's Jane Eyre, Eliot's Middlemarch, Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway). No knowledge of Russian is required.
BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Literature (LIT)..
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CLRS W4011
CLRS
4011
71082
001
MW 10:10a - 11:25a
703 HAMILTON HALL
L. Knapp 37 [ More Info ]

CLRS W 4015x Dostoevsky and Nabokov: Narratives of Transgression and Madness

A close reading of works by Dostoevsky (the Double, Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment. "The Meek One," The Brothers Karamazov) and Nabokov (Despair, Lolita). Paying particular attention to narrative strategies, the course will prepare students to apply their knowledge of Dostoevskian plot, thematics, and literary technique to two novels by the great Dostoevsky-denier Nabokov.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

SLLT W 4015y Ideology, History, Identity: South Slavic Writers from Modernism to Postmodernism and Beyond

Explores the issue of Yugoslav identity through the representative texts of major Serbian writers, such as Milos Crnjanski, Ivo Andric, Danilo Kis, Milorad Pavic, and Borislav Pekic.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

RUSS W 4017 Chekhov [English]

A close reading of Chekhov's best work in the genres on which he left an indelible mark (the short story and the drama) on the subjects that left an indelible imprint on him (medical science, the human body, identity, topography, the nature of news, the problem of knowledge, the access to pain, the necessity of dying, the structure of time, the self and the world, the part and the whole) via the modes of inquiry (diagnosis and deposition, expedition and exegesis, library and laboratory, microscopy and materialism, intimacy and invasion) and forms of documentation (the itinerary, the map, the calendar, the photograph, the icon, the Gospel, the Koan, the lie, the love letter, the case history, the obituary, the pseudonym, the script) that marked his era (and ours). No knowledge of Russian required. - C. Popkin
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLCZ W 4020 Czech Culture Before Czechoslovakia

An interpretive cultural history of the Czechs from earliest times to the founding of the first Czechoslovak republic in 1918. Emphasis on the origins, decline, and resurgence of Czech national identity as reflected in the visual arts, architecture, music, historiography, and especially the literature of the Czechs.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or instructor's permission.
3 points

HNGR W 4020 Modern Hungarian Prose in Translation: Exposing Naked Reality

This course introduces students to representative examples of an essentially robust, reality-bound, socially aware literature. In modern Hungarian prose fiction, the tradition of nineteenth-century "anecdotal realism" remained strong and was further enlivened by various forms of naturalism. Even turn-of-the century and early twentieth-century modernist fiction is characterized by strong narrative focus, psychological realism, and an emphasis on social conditions and local color. During the tumultuous decades of the century, social, political, national issues preoccupied even aesthetics-conscious experimenters and ivory-tower dwellers. Among the topics discussed will be "populist" and "urban" literature in the interwar years, post-1945 reality in fiction, literary memoirs and reportage, as well as late-century minimalist and postmodern trends.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLCZ W 4030y Postwar Czech Literature [in English]

A survey of postwar Czech fiction and drama. Knowledge of Czech not necessary. Parallel reading lists available in translation and in the original. - C. Harwood
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLCZ W 4035x The Writers of Prague

A survey of the Czech, German, and German-Jewish literary cultures of Prague from 1910 to 1920. Special attention to Hašek, Čapek, Kafka, Werfel, and Rilke. Parallel reading lists available in English and in the original.
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CLCZ W4035
CLCZ
4035
62030
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
406 HAMILTON HALL
C. Harwood 7 [ More Info ]

CLCZ W 4038y Prague Spring of '68 in Film and Literature [In English]

The course explores the unique period in Czech film and literature during the 1960s that emerged as a reaction to the imposed socialist realism. The new generation of writers (Kundera, Skvorecky, Havel, Hrabal) in turn had an influence on young emerging film makers, all of whom were part of the Czech new wave. - C. Harwood
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLSS W 4100x Central Europe and the Orient in the Works of Yugoslav Writers [In English]

The course addresses the confrontation between East and West in the works of Vla Desnica, Miroslav Krleza, Mesa Semilovic, and Ivo Andric. Discussion will target problems inherent in shaping national and individual identity, as well as the trauma caused by occupation and colonization among the South Slavs. - R. Gorup
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLPL W 4120 The Polish Short Story in a Comparative Context

The course examines the beginnings of the Polish short story in the 19th century and its development through the late 20th century, including exemplary works of major Polish writers of each period. It is also a consideration of the short story form--its generic features, its theoretical premises, and the way these respond to the stylistic and philosophical imperatives of successive periods.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLRS W 4190y Race, Ethnicity, and Narrative, in the Russian/Soviet Empire

This course examines the literary construction of ethnic and cultural identity in texts drawn from the literatures of ethnic minorities and non-Slavic nationalities that coexist within the Russian and Soviet imperial space, with attention to the historical and political context in which literary discourses surrounding racial, ethnic, and cultural particularity develop. Organized around three major regions -- the Caucasus, Central Asia, and the Russian Far East --readings include canonical "classics" by Aitmatov, Iskander, and Rytkheu as well as less-known texts, both "official" and censored.
Not offered in 2014-2015.
3 points

CLRS W 4431y Theatricality and Spectacle in the History of Russian Culture

A survey of Russian Cultural History from the late 17th Century to the present day, focused on the problems of Theater and Performance, their place in the system of power and in the structure of everyday life. Alongside with the history of Russian Theater, various manifestations of theatricality, from the 18th century Court Festivals to the Moscow Olympiad of 1980, will be studied. Readings will include milestones of Russian drama (plays by Pushkin, Gogol, Ostrovski, Chekhov, Bulgakov), theater manifestos by Stanislavski, Meierhold, Evreinov , as well as selected issues in contemporary cultural, architectural and visual theory (works by R. Barthes, M. Carlson, A.Vidler, M. Fried). All readings will be in English.
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CLRS W4431
CLRS
4431
76395
001
TuTh 2:40p - 3:55p
1219 INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BLDG
T. Smoliarova 6 [ More Info ]

CLSL W 4995x Central European Jewish Literature: Assimilation and Its Discontents

Examines prose and poetry by writers generally less accessible to the American student written in the major Central European languages: German, Hungarian, Czech, and Polish. The problematics of assimilation, the search for identity, political commitment and disillusionment are major themes, along with the defining experience of the century: the Holocaust; but because these writers are often more removed from their Jewishness, their perspective on these events and issues may be different. The influence of Franz Kafka on Central European writers, the post-Communist Jewish revival, defining the Jewish voice in an otherwise disparate body of works. - I. Sanders
3 points

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Autumn 2014 :: CLSL W4995
CLSL
4995
72637
001
TuTh 6:10p - 7:25p
406 HAMILTON HALL
I. Sanders 4 [ More Info ]

There are currently no cross-listed courses for your department.