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This presentation discussed how immigration made Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines conspicuously different societies.

Dr. Karen Seeley examines Barnard College’s response to World War II, including the College’s attempts to mobilize students and the war’s implications for college life.

Milk: A Local & Global History by Deborah Valenze, Professor of European History & Studies
 

Anthony Grafton, Professor of History at Princeton University and current President of the American Historical Association, offers a trenchant defense of humanistic scholarship as part of the Barnard Humanities Initiative.

Prof. Matar, Libyan author and member of Barnard's English faculty, answers questions on Libya through The New Yorker's "Ask the Author" webpage.

Ten years after the events of September 11, an international group of artists, writers, and activists gather to explore the effects of catastrophe and discuss creative responses to disaster.

Matt D. Childs examines how the transatlantic slave trade brought about the formation of a common identity for the Yoruba and Igbo peoples of Africa.

 

Professor Sergio DellaPergolla reexamines the main patterns and influences of international migration from the former Soviet Union.

 

Anthropology professor Nan Rothschild is spearheading an excavation project this summer in Central Park examining the remains of Seneca Village, an African-American village that was displaced when the park was created in the 1850s.

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