Go to m.barnard.edu for the Mobile Barnard web app or download it from the App Store or Google Play.

GO Newsletter 02/13/14

BARNARD COLLEGE

OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL FUNDING

 

Grant Opportunities &

News You Can Use!

February 13, 2014

 
 
We hope you will take a moment to complete our brief survey here. Your feedback will help us provide you with the best information available. As always, you can also feel free to send any comments or suggestions to grantopportunities@barnard.edu.
 
Missed a newsletter or can’t find it in your inbox? We’re archiving all newsletters on our site here.
 
If you are interested in seeking funding for your projects, please contact Chris Johnson or Curtis Harris. For individualized grant opportunity research, please contact Kaley Hanenkrat.
 
Thanks for reading!
 
Best wishes,
Kaley Hanenkrat
 
 

GRANT OPPORTUNITIES

 
Arts & Humanities Funding
 
The Endangered Language Fund has announced its 2014 Request for Proposals to provide grants for language maintenance and linguistic field work.
 
Creative Capital is accepting Letters of Inquiry through February 28 for awards in the areas of Moving Image and Visual Arts. Acting as a catalyst for the development of exceptional and imaginative ideas, Creative Capital supports artists whose work is provocative, timely and relevant; who are deeply engaged with their art forms and demonstrate a rigorous commitment to their craft; who are boldly original and push the boundaries of their genre; and who create work that has the potential to reshape the cultural landscape.
 
The Kress Foundation has announced an April 1 (and October 1) deadline for applications to their History of Art Grants Program. The History of Art program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies.
 
 
Social Sciences Funding
 
National Geographic is currently accepting pre-applications for their Expedition Council Grants. The Expeditions Council is an editorially driven grant program that supports exploration and adventure worldwide.  Proposed projects must have the potential to yield compelling stories and images. Applications are also judged on the qualifications of applicants and their teams, and on the project’s merit, uniqueness and safety protocols.
 
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has a Call for Proposals for 2014 through April 15, 2014 for support through Public Health Law Research (PHLR), a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The goal of this program is to build the evidence for and increase the use of effective regulatory, legal and policy solutions—whether statutes, regulations, case law or other policies—to protect and improve population health and the public health system.
 
Twitter has initiated a pilot project – Twitter Data Grants – to provide selected researchers and research institutions with access to data. Proposals are being accepted here through March 15.
 
 
STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Funding
 
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has an April 29, 2014 deadline for the Sustainability Research Networks Competition. The goal of the Sustainability Research Networks (SRN) competition is to bring together multidisciplinary teams of researchers, educators, managers, policymakers and other stakeholders to conduct collaborative research that addresses fundamental challenges in sustainability. The 2014 SRN competition will fund research networks with a focus on urban sustainability.
 
The American Psychological Foundation has a May 15, 2014 deadline for the John and Polly Sparks Early Career Grant for Psychologists investigating Serious Emotional Disturbances (SED) in children. The grant will provide $10,000 for research in the area of early intervention and treatment for serious emotional disturbance in children.
 
The NSF has announced an April 28, 2014 deadline for their Plant Genome Research Program (PGRP). Proposals are welcomed that build on these resources to develop conceptually new and different ideas and strategies to address grand challenge questions in plants of economic importance on a genome-wide scale. There is also a critical need for the development of novel and creative tools to facilitate new experimental approaches or new ways of analyzing genomic data.
 
The NSF has announced deadlines for the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program. The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.
 
 

NEWS ITEMS

 
The Office of Institutional Support will be hosting an NEH webinar for Barnard Faculty on NEH Grants & Fellowships on March 6. Hear from NEH on best practices and have an opportunity to ask questions of senior program officers. Check out the invitation for more information!
 
Columbia University Libraries/Information Services' Scholarly Communication Program and the Digital Humanities Center are co-sponsoring "Research Without Borders: Negotiating Constraints and Open Scholarship” on February 27, 2014.
 
Barnard College was identified in a U.S. News analysis as one of the top-performing schools in the National Universities and National Liberal Arts Colleges rankings categories for graduating students at lower income levels.  Barnard’s six-year overall graduation rate (for the fall 2006 entering class) was 90% for students who are not eligible to receive Pell Grants or subsidized Stafford loans, slightly higher than the 89% rate for students with no Pell Grants or subsidized Stafford loans. The College was also cited on a site for first generation students as an affordable elite university.
 
Experts Say Academics are Timid about Fair Use Laws – from Inside Higher Ed. A new report from the College Art Association (CAA) finds that widespread confusion and anxiety about copyright law among visual arts professionals, including art historians, constrains their work and results in self-censorship. The CAA is in the process of creating a copyright and fair use code for its members, but experts agree that fair use will always involve a gray area.
 
NSF has posted a video discussion on how mentoring matters for success in STEM fields. Panelists include awardees of the Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring--Frank Bayliss, San Francisco State University Department of Biology; Sheryl Burgstahler, University of Washington, College of Education; Lesia Crumpton-Young, University of Central Florida, Department of Engineering; Charles Thompson, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, along with student Barbara Deschamp--as well as Fae Jencks, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and NSF Assistant Director Joan Ferrini-Mundy, who leads the Education and Human Resources directorate.
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

The Endangered Language Fund
 
From the website: You can download a PDF of this Request for Proposals here.
 
The Endangered Language Fund provides grants for language maintenance and linguistic field work. The work most likely to be funded is that which serves both the native community and the field of linguistics. Work which has immediate applicability to one group and more distant application to the other will also be considered. Publishing subventions are a low priority, although they will be considered. Proposals can originate in any country. The language involved must be in danger of disappearing within a generation or two. Endangerment is a continuum, and the location on the continuum is one factor in our funding decisions.
 
Eligible expenses include consultant fees, tapes, films, travel, etc. Overhead is not allowed. Grants are normally for a one year period, though extensions may be applied for. We expect grants in this round to be less than $4,000 in size, and to average about $2,000.
 
Eligibility
Researchers and language activists from any country are eligible to apply. Awards can be made to institutions, but no administrative (overhead, indirect) costs are covered.
 
Please note that many languages in the northwestern United States of America are NOT eligible for the Language Legacies grant. These languages are covered instead by our Native Voices Endowment grant program (click here for more details). The full list of languages that are covered by the Native Voices Endowment and ineligible for the Language Legacies grant may be found in PDF form here.
 
Deadline
Applications must be received by April 22nd, 2014. Decisions will be delivered by the end of May, 2014.
 
How to Apply
There is no form, but the information requested below should be included in the first page of an electronic document, preferably a PDF file. Email the single file containing all the material to: elf@haskins.yale.edu
Applications must be submitted electronically. No mail or fax applications will be accepted. If you have any questions, please write to our address (300 George St., Suite 900, New Haven, CT 06511, USA) or email to: elf@haskins.yale.edu
 
Required Information

  • Cover Page - The first page should contain:
    • Title of the project
    • Name of language and country in which it is spoken
    • Name of primary researcher
    • Address of primary researcher (include email and, if possible, phone.)
    • Amount requested
    • Present position, education, and native language(s).
    • Previous experience and/or publications by the applicant(s) that are relevant.
    • Include the same information for collaborating researchers, if any. This information may continue on the next page.
  • Description of the Project - Beginning on a separate page, provide a description of the project. This should normally take two pages, single spaced, but the maximum is five pages. Be detailed about the type of material that is to be collected and/or produced, and the value it will have to the native community (including relatives and descendants who do not speak the language) and to linguistic science. Special consideration will be given to projects that involve children. Give a brief description of the state of endangerment of the language in question.
  • Budget - On a separate page, prepare an itemized budget that lists expected costs for the project. Eligible expenses include consultant fees, tapes, films, travel, equipment, etc. Overhead (indirect) costs are not allowed. Estimates are acceptable, but they must be realistic. Please translate the amounts into US dollars. List other sources of support you are currently receiving or expect to receive and other applications that relate to the current one.
  • Letter of Support - Two letters of support are recommended, but not required. These can be included in the electronic file or sent separately. Note that these letters, if sent separately, must arrive on or before the deadline (April 22nd, 2014) in order to be considered. If more than two letters are sent, only the first two received will be read.

 
Limit to One Proposal
A researcher can be primary researcher on only one proposal.
 
Acknowledgment of Receipt
Receipt of application will be acknowledged by email.
 
If a Grant is Awarded
Before receiving any funds, university-based applicants must show that they have met the requirements of their university's human subjects' committee. Tribal- or other-based applicants must provide equivalent assurance that proper protocols are being used.
If a grant is made and accepted, the recipient is required to provide the Endangered Language Fund with a short formal report of the project and to provide the Fund with copies of all audio and video recordings made with ELF funds, accompanying transcriptions, as well as publications resulting from materials obtained with the assistance of the grant.
 
Further enquiries can be made to:
The Endangered Language Fund
300 George Street, Suite 900
New Haven, CT 06511 USA
Tel: 203-865-6163
Fax: 203-865-8963
elf@haskins.yale.edu
endangeredlanguagefund.org


 
 
 
 
Creative Capital accepting Letters of Inquiry through February 28, 2014.
From the website: We are now accepting Letters of Inquiry in Moving Image (formerly Film/Video) and Visual Arts.  The Letter of Inquiry submission deadline is February 28th at 4pm, EST.
You must use this online form to apply for a Creative Capital award. No other format will be accepted. 

To learn more about Creative Capital's award program and eligibility, visit creative-capital.org/ourprogram

Please note that all correspondence with you will be by email. Keep us updated if your email address changes during the application and notification process and check your spam filters.

AWARD CALENDAR

  • Monday, February 3 – Friday, February 28, 2014: Letters of Inquiry (LOI) accepted
  • Friday, February 28, 2014, 4:00pm EST: LOI submission deadline
  • Friday, May 30, 2014: Notification of advancement to application stage
  • Monday, September 15, 2014: Notification of advancement to panel review
  • January 2015: Public Announcement of awards

 
If you have any technical difficulties while completing the application, please email: tech@fluidreview.com.
 

 

 

The Kress Foundation
 
From the website: History of Arts Program

  • Support for scholarly publications, art museum exhibitions and catalogues, international conferences and symposia.
  • Grants are awarded to non-profit institutions with 501(c) 3 status, based in the United States, including supporting foundations of European institutions.
  • These are competitive grants. Please see ‘Past Grants’ and ‘Annual Reports’ for past awards and typical levels of funding and review our Grants FAQs for answers to common application questions.
  • In addition to submitting printed materials, applicants should include a CD containing a complete set of the application materials.  The materials on the CD must be presented as a single PDF document.
  • Application Deadlines: January 15, April 1, and October 1 (Please note, if the application deadline falls on a weekend, applications must be received by the previous Friday.)

 
The History of Art program supports scholarly projects that will enhance the appreciation and understanding of European art and architecture. Grants are awarded to projects that create and disseminate specialized knowledge, including archival projects, development and dissemination of scholarly databases, documentation projects, museum exhibitions and publications, photographic campaigns, scholarly catalogues and publications, and technical and scientific studies.
 
Grants are also awarded for activities that permit art historians to share their expertise through international exchanges, professional meetings, conferences, symposia, consultations, the presentation of research, and other professional events.


 
 
 
 
National Geographic Explorers
 
From the website: “The Expeditions Council is an editorially driven grant program that supports exploration and adventure worldwide.  Proposed projects must have the potential to yield compelling stories and images. Applications are also judged on the qualifications of applicants and their teams, and on the project’s merit, uniqueness and safety protocols. The Council consists of representatives of National Geographic editorial divisions (magazines, television, books, website, and so on) who review and vote on grant applications, as well as an advisory board of external consultants.
 
While the Expeditions Council funds a broad range of exploration and adventure, if a project is based on scientific inquiry, applicants must provide detailed methodology.  In addition, all projects must adhere to applicable scientific or professional ethical standards, which are outlined in the grant application and are subject to scientific review
 
The Expeditions Council offers its grantees the opportunity to work effectively with National Geographic's many divisions. Grantees are therefore able to share the results of their expeditions with National Geographic's global audience.
 
Eligibility
Applicants are expected to have qualifications and experience pertinent to the expedition or project they propose. Advanced academic degrees may be required, depending on the nature of the project. Those planning work in foreign countries (i.e., a country other than their own) must include at least one local collaborator as part of their expedition team. International applicants are encouraged; however, submissions must be made in English.
 
Grant Amounts
Grants generally range from U.S. $15,000 to $35,000 and cover direct field expenses: transportation, supplies, subsistence, and permit costs as well as other related fees (e.g., interpreters, guides, and porters) that are tied to the project.
 
Expeditions Council grants are not permitted to cover professional fees for a photographer, videographer, or writer, or general media production costs:. National Geographic editorial units are responsible for covering these types of fees in their production budgets. Grants may cover fees for interpreters, drivers, porters, and other locals who are providing services to the team.
 
Grant Requirements
National Geographic reserves the right to assign coverage of grant projects by its own media teams.
The Expeditions Council requires that grant recipients give right of first refusal for coverage by all National Geographic media, including all print and digital media, television and broadcast media, lectures, exhibits, and promotion or publicity about the project.
 
Grant recipients must provide a full accounting of their expenditures on completion of the project. They are also required to submit a report summarizing their findings within two months of returning from the field.
 
Grant Restrictions
National Geographic Society grants may not be used for indirect costs, overhead, production costs and other expenses not directly related to field activities of the project, including salaries and fringe benefits. Funds may not be used for travel to scientific/professional meetings or conferences, legal actions, land acquisition, endowments, construction of permanent field stations, or publishing research results.
 
Obtaining a Grant
Applying for a grant from the Expeditions Council is a two-step process.
 
Step 1: Pre-Application
Before receiving an application form, the team leader must submit a pre-application form online. There are a few things you should know before doing so:

  • The pre-application form can be completed in multiple sessions. You will be allowed to save your work and complete it at another time.
  • You will be asked to upload an electronic copy of your curriculum vitae (CV) while completing the form. Instructions will be provided.
  • Please make sure that your browser is configured to receive cookies.
  • If you have any questions about the online pre-application form, please emailecouncil@ngs.org.
  • The Expeditions Council accepts pre-applications throughout the year. Please submit your pre-application at least six (6) months before anticipated project dates.
  • Within eight (8) weeks, the team leader will receive a decision. If the pre-application is approved, the Council will send the team leader an email with a link to the full application.
  • Fill out pre-application. (You will be asked to create an account.) or Access your saved pre-application form.

 
Step 2: Application
After receiving an application, the team leader must complete and submit their application online. There are a few things you should know before doing so:

  • The Expeditions Council accepts applications throughout the year. However, please allow four (4) months from the receipt of your application for the Expeditions Council to formally review and consider it.
  • Previous National Geographic grantees must first comply with all prior reporting and financial accounting obligations before submitting applications for additional support.”


 
 
 
 
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
 
From the website: Public Health Law Research: Making the Case for Laws That Improve Health
2014 Call for Proposals - Deadline: April 15, 2014, 3:00 p.m. ET
 
Purpose: Public Health Law Research (PHLR) is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The goal of this program is to build the evidence for and increase the use of effective regulatory, legal and policy solutions—whether statutes, regulations, case law or other policies—to protect and improve population health and the public health system. This program contributes to the Foundation’s commitment to creating a culture of health in our country by providing the best possible evidence and examples of the impact of legal strategies on health.
 
Total Awards:
Awards up to 18 months and up to $150,000 each will be funded through this round. Applicants may request up to $200,000 with strong justification for additional study expenses.
Up to $1.25 million will be available under this Call for Proposals (CFP).
Mapping studies–legal research that creates a multi-jurisdictional dataset of laws suitable for quantitative research--may also be funded in this category, but budgets for these mapping projects should not exceed $50,000 or 12-months duration.
 
Key Dates:

  • April 15, 2014 (3 p.m. ET) - Deadline for receipt of full proposals.
  • Mid-September, 2014 - Finalists notified of funding recommendations.
  • November 1, 2014 - Grants initiated

 
Eligibility and Selection Criteria
Preference will be given to those applicants that are either public entities or nonprofit organizations that are tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code or a tribal group recognized by the U.S. federal government, or affiliated with a tribal group recognized by the U.S. federal government. Applicant organizations must be based in the United States or its territories at the time of application. The focus of this program is the United States; studies involving other countries will be considered only to the extent they directly inform U.S. law and policy.
 
Consistent with RWJF values, this program embraces diversity and inclusion across multiple dimensions such as race, ethnicity, gender, age and disadvantaged socioeconomic status. We strongly encourage applications from candidates who will help us expand the perspectives and experiences we bring to our work. We believe that the more we include diverse perspectives and experiences in our work, the better able we are to help all Americans live healthier lives and get the care they need.
 

 

 

Twitter has initiated a pilot project – Twitter Data Grants – to provide selected researchers and research institutions with access to data. Proposals are being accepted here through March 15.
 
From the website: “With more than 500 million Tweets a day, Twitter has an expansive set of data from which we can glean insights and learn about a variety of topics, from health-related information such as when and where the flu may hit to global events like ringing in the new year. To date, it has been challenging for researchers outside the company who are tackling big questions to collaborate with us to access our public, historical data. Our Data Grants program aims to change that by connecting research institutions and academics with the data they need.
 
To get updates and stay in touch with the program, you can visit research.twitter.com or follow @TwitterEng and questions can be emailed to data-grants@twitter.com.

 

National Science Foundation
 
From the website: The National Science Foundation (NSF) has an upcoming deadline for Sustainability Research Networks Competition (SRN). The focus for 2014 is Urban Sustainability.
 
Synopsis of Program:
The goal of the Sustainability Research Networks (SRN) competition is to bring together multidisciplinary teams of researchers, educators, managers, policymakers and other stakeholders to conduct collaborative research that addresses fundamental challenges in sustainability. The 2014 SRN competition will fund research networks with a focus on urban sustainability.
 
Proposals should identify an ambitious and nationally important theme in urban sustainability, present a creative and innovative research agenda that builds upon existing work in this area, and describe how a network of researchers and other stakeholders will be supported that integrates a variety of disciplines, sectors and backgrounds in order to create new perspectives and yield significant new understanding and knowledge.
 
The Sustainability Research Networks competition is part of the growing NSF investment in its Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability (SEES) portfolio (www.nsf.gov/sees/). Challenges associated with broadly based SEES goals will be met by supporting fundamental science and engineering research and education needed to understand and overcome the barriers to sustainable human and environmental wellbeing and to forge reasoned pathways to a sustainable future. NSF aims to support members of the academic research community for projects which produce discoveries and knowledge that will inform decisions leading to environmental, energy, social and cultural sustainability. NSF support will advance the frontiers of conceptual, empirical and computational research in science, engineering and education so that the nation has the knowledge base to inform policies on sustainability.
 
More information on the website here.

 

 

American Psychological Foundation
 
From the website: John and Polly Sparks Early Career Grant for Psychologists Investigating Serious Emotional Disturbance (SED) will provide $10,000 for research in the area of early intervention and treatment for serious emotional disturbance in children.
 
Deadline: May 15, 2014
 
Description: The John and Polly Sparks Early Career Grant supports early career psychologists conducting research in the area of early intervention and treatment for serious emotional disturbance in children.
The John and Polly Sparks Foundation partnered with APF to empower early career psychologists to produce scientifically-based research and programs that could provide models for broad-based applications across the country.
 
Eligibility: Applicants must: (1) be a psychologist with an EdD, PsyD or PhD from an accredited university, and (2) be no more than seven years postdoctoral. 
 
Evaluation Criteria: Proposals will be evaluated on:

  • Conformance with stated program goals and qualifications.
  • Quality and impact of proposed work.
  • Innovation and contribution to the field with proposed project.
  • Applicant's demonstrated competence and capability to execute the proposed work.

 
Proposal Requirements:

  • Detailed proposal which describes the proposed project, methodology and the applicant's qualifications; and includes a detailed budget and justification.
  • Current CV.
  • Two letters of support.

 
Submission Process and Deadline:
Submit a completed application online by May 15. Please be advised that APF does not provide feedback to applicants on their proposals.
Download the request for proposals (PDF, 364KB).
 


 
 
 
National Science Foundation
 
From the website: NSF - FY14 Competition - Plant Genome Research Program (PGRP)
 
Synopsis of Program: This program is a continuation of the Plant Genome Research Program (PGRP) that began in FY 1998 as part of the National Plant Genome Initiative (NPGI). Since the inception of the NPGI and the PGRP, there has been a tremendous increase in the availability of functional genomics tools and sequence resources for use in the study of key crop plants and their models. Proposals are welcomed that build on these resources to develop conceptually new and different ideas and strategies to address grand challenge questions in plants of economic importance on a genome-wide scale. There is also a critical need for the development of novel and creative tools to facilitate new experimental approaches or new ways of analyzing genomic data. Especially encouraged are proposals that provide strong and novel training opportunities integral to the research plan and particularly across disciplines that include, but are not limited to, plant physiology, quantitative genetics, biochemistry, bioinformatics and engineering.
 
Activities in four focus areas will be supported in FY 2014: (1) Genomics-empowered plant research to tackle fundamental questions in plant sciences on a genome-wide scale; (2) Development of tools and resources for plant genome research including novel technologies and analysis tools to enable discovery; (3) Mid-Career
Investigator Awards in Plant Genome Research (MCA-PGR) to increase participation of investigators trained primarily in fields other than plant genomics; and, (4) Advancing Basic Research in Economically Important Crop Plants (ABR-PG) to develop sequence resources that are critically needed to enable basic research resources in crop plants. Proposals addressing these opportunities are welcomed at all scales, from single-investigator projects through multi-investigator, multi-institution projects, commensurate with the scope and scale of the work proposed.
 
The PGRP encourages proposals from investigators and institutions that have not participated in the program before. Proposals are encouraged from early-career investigators and proposals submitted to the CAREER program are considered by the PGRP. Early-career investigators are strongly encouraged to contact a PGRP Program Director for further guidance.\
 
 

 

 

From the website: NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program
Synopsis: CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Such activities should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply. Full guidelines available here.
 
Due Dates
Full Proposal Deadline Date:  July 21, 2014
BIO, CISE, EHR
Full Proposal Deadline Date:  July 22, 2014
ENG
Full Proposal Deadline Date:  July 23, 2014
GEO, MPS, SBE

 

 

 

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

Comes to Barnard

 

You Are Invited to an

NEH Grants & Fellowships Web Presentation

 

March 6 - 1:00-2:30 p.m. - Lunch will be provided

Diana Center, Room 502

 

Please join us on Thursday, March 6 for an exciting opportunity to connect with and “virtually” meet two program officers

from the NEH and learn more about grants and fellowships.

 

Senior Program Officers - Daniel Sack in the Division of Research Programs and

Jennifer Serventi in the Office of Digital Humanities - will discuss NEH programs and initiatives and offer tips for putting together applications.

 

The Office of Institutional Funding is hosting this NEH webinar for faculty interested in pursuing grant funding for the humanities.

 

Paul Scolieri, Co-Chair & Associate Professor in the Department of Dance, will also speak about his experiences serving on an NEH review panel and help demystify the application review process.

 

Please RSVP by February 28 to

Kaley Hanenkrat via email or at 212.870.2527.

 


 
 
 
 
Columbia University Libraries/Information ServicesScholarly Communication Program and the Digital Humanities Center are co-sponsoring "Research Without Borders: Negotiating Constraints and Open Scholarship," as part of the Research Without Borders panel discussion series. 
 
This event will take place from 1:00-3:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 27, 2014 in Garden Room 1 of Columbia's Faculty House. It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.
 
Points of discussion will include: exploring the ways research is being made openly accessible to overcome these constraints, how and why researchers have incorporated community participation into their projects, and alternative scholarship distribution models.
 
Panelists are Leith Mullings, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at CUNY; Dennis Tenen, Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities and New Media Studies at Columbia University in the Department of English and Comparative Literature; and Lela Prashad, co-founder and Chief Data Scientist at NiJeL. Moderating the panel is Manan Ahmed, Assistant Professor of History at Columbia University.
To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.