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GO Newsletter 02/27/14

BARNARD COLLEGE

OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL FUNDING

 

Grant Opportunities &

News You Can Use!

February 27, 2014

 
If you are interested in pursuing grant funding for the humanities, we invite you to join us next week on Thursday, March 6 from 1:00 to 2:30 for an NEH web presentation. Two senior program officers from NEH will discuss current programs and initiatives and offer tips for developing successful applications. If you want more details or would like to RSVP, please contact Kaley Hanenkrat
 
Please take a moment to complete a brief survey here. Your feedback is appreciated and will guide us in providing the best resources possible. As always, you can also feel free to send any comments or suggestions to grantopportunities@barnard.edu.
 
Missed a newsletter or can’t find it in your inbox? We’re archiving all newsletters on our site here.
 
If you are interested in seeking funding for your projects, please contact Chris Johnson or Curtis Harris. For individualized grant opportunity research, please contact Kaley Hanenkrat.
 
Thanks for reading!
 
Best wishes,
Kaley Hanenkrat
 
 
GRANT OPPORTUNITIES
 
Arts & Humanities Funding
 
The New York Council for the Humanities is accepting applications for “projects that use the humanities to engage people in analyzing issues, and taking part in the meaningful exchange of ideas and opinions.  Through this program, the Council distributes federal funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities directly to notable projects created by museums, libraries, historical societies, and other cultural and educational organizations. Planning grants of up to $1,500 and project grants of up to $3,000 are currently being offered (due to ongoing budget uncertainties - the Council hopes to offer larger grants again in late 2014), and deadlines are on a rolling basis. Applications are due three months before the start of your project.”
 
The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) is accepting applications through its Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics program through June 11, 2014.  “The Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics program supports documentary films that examine international and transnational themes in the humanities. These projects are meant to spark Americans’ engagement with the broader world by exploring countries and cultures outside of the United States. Proposed documentaries must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship.”
 
 
Social Sciences Funding
 
The American Psychological Foundation (APF) is accepting applications for the 2014 Visionary Grant program, “which provides seed funding for research, education and intervention projects and programs that use psychology to solve social problems. One-year grants are available in amounts of up to $20,000. The deadline for submission is April 1, 2014.”
 
The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is accepting applications through May 20, 2014 for their “research-focused initiative, the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative, which focuses on increasing the safety of schools nationwide. This wide-ranging initiative will bring together the nation’s best minds to research the root causes of school violence, develop technologies and strategies for increasing school safety, and provide pilot grants to test innovative approaches to enhance school safety across the nation.”
 
The William T. Grant Foundation is accepting proposals through May 6, 2014 in its Reducing Inequality program area, which supports “research that focuses on ways to reduce disparities in the academic, behavioral, social, and economic outcomes among youth. Priority will be given to projects related to inequality on the basis of economic, racial/ethnic, and language backgrounds; research that explores other areas of inequality will be considered based on a compelling case for its impact.”
 
 
STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Funding
 
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has a March 17, 2014 deadline for grants in Biological Anthropology. “The Biological Anthropology Program supports basic research in areas related to human evolution and contemporary human biological variation. Research areas supported by the program include, but are not limited to, human genetic variation, human and nonhuman primate ecology and adaptability, human osteology and bone biology, human and nonhuman primate paleontology, functional anatomy, and primate socioecology.” 
 
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has a March 26, 2014 deadline for grants in Genealogy of Life (GoLife). “The ultimate vision of this program is an open access, universal Genealogy of Life that will provide the comparative framework necessary for testing questions in systematics, evolutionary biology, ecology, and other fields.” 
 
The National Science Foundation (NSF) published a letter on February 19, 2014 announcing an interest in “stimulating research related to the Science of Broadening Participation (SBP). The Science of Broadening Participation will employ the theories, methods, and analytic techniques of the social, behavioral, economic, and learning sciences to better understand the barriers that hinder and factors that enhance our ability to broaden participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The results of these efforts will inform approaches to increase the access and involvement of underrepresented groups in STEM and to strengthen our national STEM capabilities and competitive advantage.”
 
 
NEWS ITEMS
 
The Office of Institutional Support will be hosting an NEH webinar for Barnard Faculty on NEH Grants & Fellowships on March 6. Hear from NEH on best practices and have an opportunity to ask questions to Program Officers. Check out the invitation for more information!
 
Project Kalediscope (PKAL) is accepting applications for the Summer Leadership Institute (SLI). “The PKAL Summer Leadership Institutes are designed for both early- and mid-career STEM faculty engaged in leading projects aimed at transforming undergraduate STEM education in their classrooms, departments, and institutions. The deadline is March 24, 2014.”

 

 

 

The New York Council for the Humanities’ Grants Program
 
From the website: "The Council funds projects that use the humanities to engage people in analyzing issues, and taking part in the meaningful exchange of ideas and opinions. The goals of our public humanities grants are:

  • To encourage informed public discourse in communities across New York State.
  • To help New Yorkers deepen their understanding of the world around them.
  • To actively engage New Yorkers with issues and ideas.

 
All projects supported by the Council must be intended for and open to a general public audience. Priority is given to projects serving people for whom such opportunities are rare and projects where dialogue is integral to actively engaging the program(s) target audience(s).
 
All projects should also involve a strong project team, including members with humanities expertise.
The Council does not fund: scholarly research projects or conferences; stand-alone books, catalogues, films or videos; capital projects; political action or advocacy programs.
 
Planning grants of up to $1,500 and project grants of up to $3,000 are currently being offered (due to ongoing budget uncertainties - the Council hopes to offer larger grants again in late 2014), and deadlines are on a rolling basis. Applications are due three months before the start of your project. Grant applications are batched and reviewed on a monthly basis by committee; committee decisions for each batch are made within 2 months of the submission date.
 
For the latest updates on all available funding opportunities from the Council, sign up for Grant News."

 
 
 
 
The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics
 
From the website: "The Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics program supports documentary films that examine international and transnational themes in the humanities. These projects are meant to spark Americans’ engagement with the broader world by exploring countries and cultures outside of the United States. Proposed documentaries must be analytical and deeply grounded in humanities scholarship.
The Division of Public Programs encourages innovative nonfiction storytelling that presents multiple points of view in creative formats.  The proposed film should range in length from thirty minutes to a feature-length documentary.
We invite a wide range of approaches to international and transnational topics and themes, such as

  • an examination of a critical issue in ethics, religion, literature, or history, viewed through an international lens;
  • an exploration of a topic that transcends a single nation-state;
  • a biography of a foreign leader, writer, artist, or historical figure; or
  • an exploration of the history and culture(s) of a specific region, country, or community outside of the United States.

 
Program Statistics
In the last four competitions the Bridging Cultures through Film: International Topics program received an average of 79 applications. The program made an average of six awards per competition, for a funding ratio of 8 percent.
 
The number of applications to an NEH grant program can vary widely competition to competition, as can the funding ratio. Information about the average number of applications and awards in recent competitions is meant only to provide historical context for the current competition. Information on the number of applications and awards in individual competitions is available from publicpgms@neh.gov.
 
Questions?
Contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Public Programs at 202-606-8269 or publicpgms@neh.gov. Hearing-impaired applicants can contact NEH via TDD at 1-866-372-2930."
 

 

 

 

The American Psychological Foundation
 
From the website:  The American Psychological Foundation (APF) is accepting applications for the 2014 Visionary Grant program. One-year grants are available in amounts of up to $20,000.
 
From the website:
APF Visionary Grants seek to seed innovation through supporting research, education and intervention projects and programs that use psychology to solve social problems in the following priority areas:

  • Understanding and fostering the connection between behavior and physical health to ensure well-being.
  • Reducing stigma and prejudice to promote unity and harmony.
  • Understanding and preventing violence to create a safer, more humane world.
  • Supporting programs that address the long-term psychological needs of individuals and communities in the aftermath of disaster. 

 
The deadline for submission is April 1, 2014, and details are available here.

 

 

 

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ)
 
From the website: “The Department of Justice Appropriations Act, 2014, provides funds for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to undertake a research-focused initiative, the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative, to increase the safety of schools nationwide. This wide-ranging initiative will bring together the nation’s best minds to research the root causes of school violence, develop technologies and strategies for increasing school safety, and provide pilot grants to test innovative approaches to enhance school safety across the nation.
 
The Department of Justice Appropriations Act, 2014, provides funds for a broad, research-focused initiative to increase the safety of schools nationwide.  As a part of this initiative, NIJ seeks the best and brightest research ideas for increasing school safety in the United States.  The range of research questions and methodologies available under this solicitation is very broad. The research methodology may include, for example, natural experiments, randomized controlled trials, demonstration field experiments, longitudinal studies, and secondary data analysis.
 
The Act also calls for NIJ to develop a strategy and Comprehensive School Safety Model for communities to use to enhance their local school safety. From a research perspective, this is an unusually large undertaking with many moving parts. As a result, and consistent with the Act, under this solicitation NIJ will consider particularly ambitious proposals that exceed the typical size, scope, and duration of NIJ’s grants
 
Under the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative, NIJ will make available approximately $15 million dollars for multiple grants that will address school safety issues directly. Each research effort funded must contribute to our base of knowledge and evidence building about school safety.
 
Accordingly, the research should look broadly at an array of factors that contribute to school safety. Each component of the Comprehensive School Safety Initiative shall adhere to a single guiding principle: every activity aims to build a solid foundation of knowledge and best practices upon which communities across this country can develop and implement individualized school safety programs that have endured rigorous scientific testing. Congress has identified, as a beginning point, a number of examples of factors and issues related to comprehensive school safety programs that investigators may consider for research and evaluation under this solicitation:

  • The root causes of school violence.
  • Technologies and strategies for increasing school safety, such as surveillance cameras and other safety directed technologies.
  • School-to-prison pipeline.
  • School safety assessments and plans.
  • Evaluation of school safety technical assistance or training.
  • Other programs and technologies intended to enhance overall school safety.
  • Gaps in the nation’s mental health system as it may relate to school safety.
  • Exposure to violence in the media as it may relate to school safety.
  • Testing promising new approaches to school safety.
  • Development and implementation of appropriate school safety training modules.
  • Environmental approaches to school safety, including school design and layout.

 
In addition to the previous aspects of school safety, investigators also may consider applying for funding for research projects focused on determining the efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency (cost/benefit) and/or sustainability of the following areas as they relate to or impact school safety:

  • School resource officers and other law enforcement support.
  • School mental health professionals and support systems.
  • Student/teacher/staff engagement techniques and models.
  • Parental engagement and community support.
  • Efforts to improve school climate and culture.”

 

 

 

The William T. Grant Foundation
 
From the website: “The William T. Grant Foundation believes that the research community can play a critical role in reversing this trend. To that end, the foundation, which seeks to improve the lives of youth between the ages of 5 and 25, has launched a new research initiative to support projects that advance understanding in the area of inequality in youth development.
 
Through its new Understanding Inequality program, the foundation will award grants of up to $600,000 in support of research that focuses on ways to reduce disparities in the academic, behavioral, social, and economic outcomes among youth. Priority will be given to projects related to inequality on the basis of economic, racial/ethnic, and language backgrounds; research that explores other areas of inequality will be considered based on a compelling case for its impact.
 
To be eligible, organizations must be considered tax exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. See the William T. Grant Foundation Web site for complete program guidelines, application instructions, and an FAQ.”

 

 

 

The National Science Foundation - Biological Anthropology Program
 
From the website: “The Biological Anthropology Program supports basic research in areas related to human evolution and contemporary human biological variation. Research areas supported by the program include, but are not limited to, human genetic variation, human and nonhuman primate ecology and adaptability, human osteology and bone biology, human and nonhuman primate paleontology, functional anatomy, and primate socioecology. Grants supported in these areas are united by an underlying evolutionary framework, and often by a consideration of adaptation as a central theoretical theme. Many proposals also have a biocultural orientation. The program frequently serves as a bridge within NSF between the social and behavioral sciences and the natural and physical sciences, and proposals commonly are jointly reviewed and funded with other programs.
 
For more information about Multidisciplinary Research and Training Opportunities, please visit the SBE Office of Multidisciplinary Activities web site.
 
For additional, specific information on the Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grants, please visit the Biological Anthropology specific page.”
 

 

 

 

The National Science Foundation - Genealogy of Life
 
From the website: “Upcoming deadline: March 26, 2014
 
All of comparative biology depends on knowledge of the evolutionary relationships (phylogeny) of living and extinct organisms. In addition, understanding biodiversity and how it changes over time is only possible when Earth's diversity is organized into a phylogenetic framework. The goals of the Genealogy of Life (GoLife) program are to resolve the phylogenetic history of life and to integrate this genealogical architecture with underlying organismal data.
 
The ultimate vision of this program is an open access, universal Genealogy of Life that will provide the comparative framework necessary for testing questions in systematics, evolutionary biology, ecology, and other fields. A further strategic integration of this genealogy of life with data layers from genomic, phenotypic, spatial, ecological and temporal data will produce a grand synthesis of biodiversity and evolutionary sciences. The resulting knowledge infrastructure will enable synthetic research on biological dynamics throughout the history of life on Earth, within current ecosystems, and for predictive modeling of the future evolution of life.
 
Projects submitted to this program should emphasize increased efficiency in contributing to a complete Genealogy of Life and integration of various types of organismal data with phylogenies.
 
This program also seeks to broadly train next generation, integrative phylogenetic biologists, creating the human resource infrastructure and workforce needed to tackle emerging research questions in comparative biology. Projects should train students for diverse careers by exposing them to the multidisciplinary areas of research within the proposal.”

 

 

 

The National Science Foundation - Stimulating Research Related to the Science of Broadening Participation
 
From the website: The National Science Foundation published a letter on February 19, 2014 announcing an interest in “stimulating research related to the Science of Broadening Participation (SBP). The Science of Broadening Participation will employ the theories, methods, and analytic techniques of the social, behavioral, economic, and learning sciences to better understand the barriers that hinder and factors that enhance our ability to broaden participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The results of these efforts will inform approaches to increase the access and involvement of underrepresented groups in STEM and to strengthen our national STEM capabilities and competitive advantage.
 
“In FY 2014, SBE and EHR will partner to support SBP research proposals that will contribute to the overall understanding of the positive and negative factors impacting the participation of underrepresented individuals in STEM education and careers. SBP research proposals may focus on factors such as the following:

  • Institutional and organizational factors (e.g., studies of organizational, structural, cultural or climate factors that impact STEM participation)
  • Cultural and social factors (e.g., studies of psychological or behavioral factors that affect STEM participation and achievement rates)
  • Economic and policy-related factors (e.g., studies of economic factors that impact STEM participation and the relationship between broader participation and social innovation)

 
“We anticipate that many of the fields represented within SBE and EHR can contribute to the Science of Broadening Participation. Some examples of potential research questions related to the SBP include but are not limited to:

  • What are the underlying psychological and social issues affecting the different participation and graduation rates in STEM of women, men, persons with disabilities, and racial and ethnic minorities?
  • Under which conditions do behavioral, economic, and socio-legal factors influence recruitment and retention in STEM education at the individual, meso, and macro levels?
  • What aspects of preK-12, informal, and higher education learning environments and workplace culture moderate the factors impacting underrepresented minorities, women, and/or persons with disabilities?
  • What behavioral or economic processes result in outcomes that are associated with success in STEM?
  • What theoretical approaches predict success in ensuring that young people from underrepresented groups do not lose interest in science during adolescence?
  • What are the impacts of a diverse STEM workforce on scientific productivity and innovation and the national economy?

 
“Scholars with research proposals that contribute to the Science of Broadening Participation should submit proposals to the most relevant programs of the SBE Directorate and designate the proposal as SBP by including "SBP" at the beginning of the proposal title. Information concerning SBE programs may be found on the following web sites under each one's respective Program and Funding Opportunities section: Behavioral and Cognitive SciencesSocial and Economic Sciences, and SBE Multidisciplinary Activities.
 
“Alternately, proposals may also be submitted to any of the EHR education research programs. In particular, scholars may wish to consider the Broadening Participation Research strand in the Research on Education and Learning (REAL) program or the Broadening Participation in STEM strand in the EHR Core Research (ECR) program.”

 

 

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)

Comes to Barnard

 

You Are Invited to an

NEH Grants & Fellowships Web Presentation

 

March 6 - 1:00-2:30 p.m. - Lunch will be provided

Diana Center, Room 502

 

Please join us on Thursday, March 6 for an exciting opportunity to connect with and “virtually” meet two program officers

from the NEH and learn more about grants and fellowships.

 

Senior Program Officers - Daniel Sack in the Division of Research Programs and

Jennifer Serventi in the Office of Digital Humanities - will discuss NEH programs and initiatives and offer tips for putting together applications.

 

The Office of Institutional Funding is hosting this NEH webinar for faculty interested in pursuing grant funding for the humanities.

 

Paul Scolieri, Co-Chair & Associate Professor in the Department of Dance, will also speak about his experiences serving on an NEH review panel and help demystify the application review process.

 

Please RSVP by February 28 to

Kaley Hanenkrat via email or at 212.870.2527.

 

 

 

PKAL Summer Leadership Institute for STEM Faculty - Applications Due March 24
 
From the website: The PKAL Summer Leadership Institute is designed for both early- and mid-career STEM faculty engaged in leading projects aimed at transforming undergraduate STEM education in their classrooms, departments, and institutions. The Institute curriculum is grounded in a carefully coordinated blend of theory and practice related to the politics of institutional transformation, and aims to empower STEM faculty to act as agents of change in their home institutions and/or professional societies. Personalized mentoring and professional coaching are cornerstones of the Institute experience.  As such, a team of six to eight expert mentors works with participants throughout the Institute to shape a personal agenda for leadership and to guide participants in conceptualizing how they can implement institutional change action plans at their institutions. Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply. For more information on the Institute, click here.
 
Fellowship Awards Available: This year, PKAL will offer travel and/or registration awards for STEM faculty with demonstrated commitment to and experience in integrating elements of sustainability into STEM course content.  Applicants should indicate within their submission materials evidence of individual and institutional priorities related to incorporating sustainability into curriculum improvement efforts.  Applicants are expected to be poised for departmental, institutional, and national leadership in promoting STEM courses that are comprised of: 1) real-world issues; 2) connections of these real-world issues to the concepts of sustainability; and 3) opportunities for students to analyze and implement choices that can better solve societal problems.