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Summer in the City

We are no longer accepting applications for Summer 2014. 

We will be updating the website in stages for Summer 2015. Please join our mailing list for notification of updates. 

Sunday, June 22 - Saturday, July 19, 2014

4-Week Program, Residential & Commuter, Rising high school juniors and seniors

Students select two courses, a morning class and an afternoon class to be attended Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. On Wednesdays, students participate in our Life After College Series. 

Summer 2014 Pre-College Courses 

Choose an area of interest: 

Acting

Architecture

Art History

Dance

Filmmaking History Journalism

Literature

Political Science

Psychology

Religion

Studio Art Theatre Writing

Choose a class time (Morning or Afternoon)


Acting:

ACTING: PROCESS AND PERFORMANCE (CLOSED!)

Ari Kreith

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

New York's vibrant theatre scene is in our classroom! Students will hone their acting technique while deepening their understanding of the process of developing plays. We will rehearse and perform monologues and scenes and have the option to write short plays and/or perform songs. These hands-on opportunities will alternate with trips to the theatre, a Broadway backstage tour, and visits from guest artists including actors, directors, and playwrights. Students may also perform monologues for their peers at the end of the summer at the PCP Festival of the Arts.

 

Architecture:

ARCHITECTURAL CULTURE AND NYC DESIGN STUDIO (CLOSED!)

Marcelo Lopez-Dinardi

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

Architecture is a key component of our built environment in many ways. Its presence glosses entire cities, but the building, perhaps the main feature of architecture, is not the sole figure within this complex scenario: we live and work in buildingsArchitecture is the design that surrounds us, but also the relations between our hand-size design objects and our city-wide aspirations. Architecture, as a part of a larger cultural apparatus, is a character that both interacts and creates a wide mode of social forms of political engagement. Architecture is both the visible and the invisible that encompasses culture, and the ideas and concepts that produce it. This course will take the form of an architectural studio and seminar, with the fascinating city of New York as its context. We will have our own studio space at Barnard and will visit the city to confirm and test our in-house speculations. NYC will provide the background to develop a small project similar to those in an architectural studio course, and it will also be the place where we develop our sketchbooks, explore architecture with photography, and discuss our readings about architecture. No particular skills or previous knowledge is required to dive into the architectural culture and work within a studio environment.

 

Art History:

MASTERPIECES OF ART IN NEW YORK CITY

Kent Minturn

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

This course will introduce students to some of the major works of Western Art currently located in New York. We will begin with the Greek period and conclude with the contemporary art scene in Chelsea. Slide lectures, class discussions, and readings will be supplemented with visits to New York City's world-renowned museums.

NY IN ART AND FILM (CLOSED!)

Ted Barrow

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From its early days as a pre-Hollywood hub of film studios, New York City has played a central role in film in the 20th century, one which corresponds directly to the production of modern art.  In this course, comparisons between art-making and film-making will be made, while students will also be introduced to the core literature of modernist writing.  Breaking up into four different periods: 1890-The Great Depression, WWII-the early 60's, the 60's and 70's, and finally the post-modern era of art and film, each week will focus on a group of artists or directors (including D.H. Griffith, The Ashcan School, Diego Rivera, Sergei Eisenstein, Joseph Cornell, Andy Warhol, Martin Scorsese, and Julian Schnabel) who explore the intersection of art and film, particularly in New York City.

 

Dance:

THE RIGOR AND ROMANCE OF DANCE

Siobhan Burke

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

So you think you know dance? This non-studio dance course will examine several major dance traditions, among them classical ballet, modern dance, tap, ballroom dance, and dancing for the camera. The class will use Barnard’s excellent Media Services collection and the world-famous Jerome Robbins Dance Division of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center as we learn to critically analyze, write about, and discuss various forms of dance through film, readings and live performances. We will attend performances at theaters in the city and, perhaps, relevant art exhibitions, as well as take a class in one kind of social dance at Lincoln Center's Midsummer Night's Swing!* There will also be one or two guest lecturers - leading critics and/or historians of dance.
*subject to availability

 

Filmmaking:

SCREENWRITING: THE SHORT FORM

Helen Kaplan

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From film festivals to cell phones, short films are everywhere. This workshop will demystify the art of screenwriting and give you the tools you need to write a great short script. You will learn how to grab viewers by their collective shirt collar and, more importantly, hold their attention until the final credits roll. Emphasis will be placed on visual storytelling, the classic three-act structure, plot, character development, conflict, and dialogue. Through writing exercises, script analyses, and film screenings, students will learn the craft of screenwriting. By the end of the course, each student will have written three short screenplays as well as revised one of these scripts.

BEGINNING FILMMAKING: FROM SCRIPT TO SCREEN (CLOSED!)

Helen Kaplan

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

This immersive filmmaking course will give you the tools you need to make a great short film. You will dream up screen stories and get your ideas down on the page during pre-production. You will shoot and direct your cast, bringing your words and images to life during production. And finally, you will edit your footage into an original short film during post-production. Since film is a collaborative medium, students will crew, act, produce, and shoot each other’s projects in order to experience all aspects of filmmaking. Using New York as both a set and a source of inspiration, students will also attend film screenings and visit organizations that promote and produce cinema. Previous experience shooting and editing is highly recommended.

 

History:

A BRIEF HISTORY OF EVIL

Drew Thomases

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From the Hebrew Bible to South Park, how have people imagined the forces of evil in literature, film, and art? This course investigates representations of evil (Satan, hell, demons, gods and goddesses, etc.), and how such representations have shaped the way diverse religious communities come to make sense of the world around them. With close attention to artistic and textual examples, students will consider the complex language and imagery deployed in discussions of evil.

NY IN ART AND FILM (CLOSED!)

Ted Barrow

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From its earliest days as a pre-Hollywood hub of film studios, New York City has played a central role in film in the 20th century, one which corresponds directly to the production of modern art. In this course, comparisons between art-making and film-making will be made, while students will also be introduced to the core literature of modernist writing. Breaking up into four different periods: 1890-The Great Depression, WWII - the early 60's, the 60's and 70's, and finally the post-modern era of art and film, each week will focus on a group of artists or directors (including D.H Griffith, The Ashcan School, Diego Rivera, Sergei Eisenstein, Joseph Cornell, Andy Warhol, Martin Scorsese, and Julian Schnabel) who explore the intersection of art and film, particularly in New York City.

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: US POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE (CLOSED!)

Raymond Smith

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

"The First New Nation." "Global Superpower." "The American Exception." "The Indispensable Nation." All of these, and many other terms, have been used to describe the place of the US in the world today. In this engaging and interactive course, we will explore many dimensions of the place of the United States in the world, both the ways in which it is unique and the ways in which it is part of a larger family of nations. The course will include field trips, including trips to the United Nations and to Federal Hall in Lower Manhattan, one of the birthplaces of American democracy. Additionally, the class will introduce students to all four of the major subfields of political science in the United States -- comparative politics, international relations, political theory, and American politics -- making it ideal for potential future college political science majors.

EXPLORING GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES (CLOSED!)

Aurelie Roy

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

Did you know that New York City has the largest Native American population of all American cities? Since the 1970s, Native American people in the US and indigenous people around the world have become increasingly visible in the international arena. This course explores how indigenous people(s) and nation-states have negotiated the promotion and protection of indigenous rights and explores their successes and failures in doing so. The course combines two perspectives: international relations (which help account for decision-making on the part of States) and international organizations (which allow us to examine international agreements and the work of non-governmental organizations working on indigenous issues). These points of entry into national histories and the international arena will illustrate how societies change over time through the modification of their political, social, legal, and economic frameworks. Primary sources (newspapers, photographs, films, videos, etc.) will provide food for thought on these themes. The course will be complemented by a trip to the New York Library, a trip to the UN, and, if possible, an event featuring an indigenous speaker discussing issues related to the course.

SEX AND BETRAYAL: THE RENAISSANCE TABOO--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Benjamin Van Wagoner

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

To know a culture, know what it’s afraid of. On the stages of London around 1600, any shoemaker could see a ‘Hells mouth’ and devils, murderous Moors like Othello, and the chilling witches of Macbeth, but these were spectacles, flourishes—just icing on the cake of the really unspeakable: taboos. Playwrights filled the seats with scandals that couldn’t be dealt with anywhere else: incest, treason, fratricide, rape, devil worship. An entire subgenre, the sex tragedy, emerged as a result of these otherwise unapproachable topics. Why? This course will approach English drama from the age of Shakespeare (1580-1620) as a way of understanding England's culture through the taboos its performers enacted on stage. This course will explore what it means to make something taboo (in 1600 and today) and will investigate the role of performance and drama in taboo-ifiying. How do we decide what is just ‘bad form,’ and what’s really unspeakably wrong? Do those unspeakable, unimaginable evils change over time, and if so, how? How can these things be performed onstage when they can barely be talked about? This course will include performance workshops, film screenings and (of course) readings of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries (Marlowe, Webster, Middleton, and Ford). We’ll also voyage downtown to attend at least one reading and one performance of plays from this period.

HUMAN RIGHTS IN WORLD LITERATURE--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Nicole Gervasio

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

What power does literature have to mobilize public responses to human rights abuses? How does literature develop our political awareness, not only of global social injustice but also of individual social differences? In this course, we will consider the opportunities and limitations in thinking of literature as a call to conscience that intellectually and emotionally engages readers. In particular, we will focus on English-speaking world writers who feature New York City as a setting for contests over human rights (including Teju Cole, Julia Alvarez, Toni Morrison, Edwidge Danticat, Art Spiegelman, Michelle Cliff, and Jamaica Kincaid). The myriad historical issues with which we will engage include imperialism, slavery, violence against women, genocide and the Holocaust, homophobia, immigration, and more. We will also explore the legal and historical frameworks that undergird human rights discourses in both canonical world literature and grassroots cultural forms, such as spoken word, documentary, independent film, and graphic memoir. This course is ideal for students who are interested in studying literature as well as those who are considering pursuing concentrations in urban studies, American or ethnic studies, women and gender studies, law, and politics in college.

 

Journalism:

JOURNALISM AND POLITICS IN THE DIGITAL AGE--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Burcu Baykurt

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

Digital technology is challenging and changing established journalistic and political institutions on a number of fronts, from the increasing use of data in journalism to the movements such as “Occupy” and the “Arab Spring” to the recent Snowden leaks. This course will explore the digital transformations in journalism and politics along with the consequences of our widespread use of the Internet. What constitutes journalism in an era when anyone with a phone camera and Internet connection can engage in those acts? What level of political knowledge and participation should we expect of citizens, and how do digital media facilitate those levels? This course will provide excellent preparation for students interested in journalism and media studies as well as related fields such as political communications and media policy. With visits to New York City-based newsrooms, digital media companies, and advocacy organizations, we will collectively chart out what kind of roles and responsibilities citizens have in the era of digital media and politics. 

 

Literature:

HUMAN RIGHTS IN WORLD LITERATURE--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Nicole Gervasio

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

What power does literature have to mobilize public responses to human rights abuses? How does literature develop our political awareness, not only of global social injustice but also of individual social differences? In this course, we will consider the opportunities and limitations in thinking of literature as a call to conscience that intellectually and emotionally engages readers. In particular, we will focus on English-speaking world writers who feature New York City as a setting for contests over human rights (including Teju Cole, Julia Alvarez, Toni Morrison, Edwidge Danticat, Art Spiegelman, Michelle Cliff, and Jamaica Kincaid). The myriad historical issues with which we will engage include imperialism, slavery, violence against women, genocide and the Holocaust, homophobia, immigration, and more. We will also explore the legal and historical frameworks that undergird human rights discourses in both canonical world literature and grassroots cultural forms, such as spoken word, documentary, independent film, and graphic memoir. This course is ideal for students who are interested in studying literature as well as those who are considering pursuing concentrations in urban studies, American or ethnic studies, women and gender studies, law, and politics in college.

RELIGION, LITERATURE, AND LOVE--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Liane Carlson

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

What is love?  Can a good action be motivated by desire?  Is it possible to know those we love, or is all love based on projection and self-deception?  If love requires lack or need, how can an all-powerful God love?  What makes love end?  These are some of the questions we will be asking in this interdisciplinary course about Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish, and Muslim understandings of love and desire in literature, art, film, philosophy, and economics.

SEX AND BETRAYAL: THE RENAISSANCE TABOO--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Benjamin Van Wagoner

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

To know a culture, know what it’s afraid of. On the stages of London around 1600, any shoemaker could see a ‘Hells mouth’ and devils, murderous Moors like Othello, and the chilling witches of Macbeth, but these were spectacles, flourishes—just icing on the cake of the really unspeakable: taboos. Playwrights filled the seats with scandals that couldn’t be dealt with anywhere else: incest, treason, fratricide, rape, devil worship. An entire subgenre, the sex tragedy, emerged as a result of these otherwise unapproachable topics.  Why? This course will approach English drama from the age of Shakespeare (1580-1620) as a way of understanding England's culture through the taboos its performers enacted on stage. This course will explore what it means to make something taboo (in 1600 and today) and will investigate the role of performance and drama in taboo-ifiying. How do we decide what is just ‘bad form,’ and what’s really unspeakably wrong? Do those unspeakable, unimaginable evils change over time, and if so, how? How can these things be performed onstage when they can barely be talked about? This course will include performance workshops, film screenings and (of course) readings of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries (Marlowe, Webster, Middleton, and Ford). We’ll also voyage downtown to attend at least one reading and one performance of plays from this period.

 

Political Science:

CRIME AND SOCIETY (CLOSED!)

Roslyn Myers

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

Law guides human behavior, so every action, from buying a newspaper at the newsstand to the way you interact with your peers on campus to the way you protect your home from intruders at night is affected by statutory laws, regulations, and the U.S. Constitution. This class will explore the various dimensions of the law as a social institution, looking specifically at the criminal justice system as an expression of societal values, norms, and expectations. Together, we will struggle with the question of whether the outcomes in the justice system align with its purported goals. Active class discussion, critical thinking, and the oral and written expression of ideas will be emphasized. Whatever perspective(s) you bring to the class, expect to be challenged regularly.

AMERICA IN THE WORLD: US POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE (CLOSED!)

Raymond Smith

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

"The First New Nation." "Global Superpower." "The American Exception." "The Indispensable Nation." All of these, and many other terms, have been used to describe the place of the US in the world today. In this engaging and interactive course, we will explore many dimensions of the place of the United States in the world, both the ways in which it is unique and the ways in which it is part of a larger family of nations. The course will include field trips, including trips to the United Nations and to Federal Hall in Lower Manhattan, one of the birthplaces of American democracy. Additionally, the class will introduce students to all four of the major subfields of political science in the United States -- comparative politics, international relations, political theory, and American politics -- making it ideal for potential future college political science majors.

EXPLORING GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Aurelie Roy

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

Did you know that New York City has the largest Native American population of all American cities? Since the 1970s, Native American people in the US and indigenous people around the world have become increasingly visible in the international arena. This course explores how indigenous people(s) and nation-states have negotiated the promotion and protection of indigenous rights and explores their successes and failures in doing so. The course combines two perspectives: international relations (which help account for decision-making on the part of States) and international organizations (which allow us to examine international agreements and the work of non-governmental organizations working on indigenous issues). These points of entry into national histories and the international arena will illustrate how societies change over time through the modification of their political, social, legal, and economic frameworks. Primary sources (newspapers, photographs, films, videos, etc.) will provide food for thought on these themes. The course will be complemented by a trip to the New York Library, a trip to the UN, and, if possible, an event featuring an indigenous speaker discussing issues related to the course.

JOURNALISM AND POLITICS IN THE DIGITAL AGE--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Burcu Baykurt

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

Digital technology is challenging and changing established journalistic and political institutions on a number of fronts, from the increasing use of data in journalism to the movements such as “Occupy” and the “Arab Spring” to the recent Snowden leaks. This course will explore the digital transformations in journalism and politics along with the consequences of our widespread use of the Internet. What constitutes journalism in an era when anyone with a phone camera and Internet connection can engage in those acts? What level of political knowledge and participation should we expect of citizens, and how do digital media facilitate those levels? This course will provide excellent preparation for students interested in journalism and media studies as well as related fields such as political communications and media policy. With visits to New York City-based newsrooms, digital media companies, and advocacy organizations, we will collectively chart out what kind of roles and responsibilities citizens have in the era of digital media and politics. 

HUMAN RIGHTS IN WORLD LITERATURE--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Nicole Gervasio

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

What power does literature have to mobilize public responses to human rights abuses? How does literature develop our political awareness, not only of global social injustice but also of individual social differences? In this course, we will consider the opportunities and limitations in thinking of literature as a call to conscience that intellectually and emotionally engages readers. In particular, we will focus on English-speaking world writers who feature New York City as a setting for contests over human rights (including Teju Cole, Julia Alvarez, Toni Morrison, Edwidge Danticat, Art Spiegelman, Michelle Cliff, and Jamaica Kincaid). The myriad historical issues with which we will engage include imperialism, slavery, violence against women, genocide and the Holocaust, homophobia, immigration, and more. We will also explore the legal and historical frameworks that undergird human rights discourses in both canonical world literature and grassroots cultural forms, such as spoken word, documentary, independent film, and graphic memoir. This course is ideal for students who are interested in studying literature as well as those who are considering pursuing concentrations in urban studies, American or ethnic studies, women and gender studies, law, and politics in college.

 

Psychology:

PSYCH 101 (CLOSED!)

Jamie Krenn

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

Psychology can be defined as the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. While psychology is most often associated with clinical issues (i.e. abnormal, personality), this makes up only a small portion of the field. This is a broad survey course covering topics such as physiological, social, organizational, and developmental psychology. The course will develop one’s understanding of seeing psychology as a science of human thought and behavior. Topics covered will be a helpful tool for most university introductory psychology courses.

PSYCHOLOGY OF MEDIA (CLOSED!)

Jamie Krenn

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

Explore the psychology behind media and how it affects you, your peers and the public at large.  If this sounds right up your blog — our course will examine the internet, mobile media, video games and how learning and media go hand in hand to facilitate understanding and decision-making.  You will be introduced to psychological theories and research, and the cognitive processes of media development. Guest speakers will include a writer from Nick, Jr., MTV and others.

 

Religion:

A BRIEF HISTORY OF EVIL

Drew Thomases

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From the Hebrew Bible to South Park, how have people imagined the forces of evil in literature, film, and art? This course investigates representations of evil (Satan, hell, demons, gods and goddesses, etc.), and how such representations have shaped the way diverse religious communities come to make sense of the world around them. With close attention to artistic and textual examples, students will consider the complex language and imagery deployed in discussions of evil.

RELIGION, LITERATURE, AND LOVE--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Liane Carlson

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

What is love?  Can a good action be motivated by desire?  Is it possible to know those we love, or is all love based on projection and self-deception?  If love requires lack or need, how can an all-powerful God love?  What makes love end?  These are some of the questions we will be asking in this interdisciplinary course about Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Jewish, and Muslim understandings of love and desire in literature, art, film, philosophy, and economics.

 

Studio Art:

Making Contemporary Art NYC (CLOSED!)

Julia Westerbeke

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

New York City has one of the largest and most influential art communities in the world, which is why it can be such an inspiring and productive place for a young artist. Through trips to contemporary art galleries and museums, visits with practicing artists, creative workshops, readings and in-depth discussions, students will gain an understanding of the art world and what it is like to make work within this diverse and creative community. Students will execute their own creative projects based on ideas that we have discussed and experienced during the course. Fundamental techniques for drawing will be paired with more experimental art projects (including collage, mixed-media and sculpture). An emphasis will be placed on contemporary art happening in the city today and how it relates to historic art movements of the 20th century, among them Surrealism, Appropriation Art and Pop Art. The course will culminate in a group exhibition and reception at the McCagg Gallery on Barnard campus.

 

Theatre:

SEX AND BETRAYAL: THE RENAISSANCE TABOO--NEW! (CLOSED!)

Benjamin Van Wagoner

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

To know a culture, know what it’s afraid of. On the stages of London around 1600, any shoemaker could see a ‘Hells mouth’ and devils, murderous Moors like Othello, and the chilling witches of Macbeth, but these were spectacles, flourishes—just icing on the cake of the really unspeakable: taboos. Playwrights filled the seats with scandals that couldn’t be dealt with anywhere else: incest, treason, fratricide, rape, devil worship. An entire subgenre, the sex tragedy, emerged as a result of these otherwise unapproachable topics.  Why? This course will approach English drama from the age of Shakespeare (1580-1620) as a way of understanding England's culture through the taboos its performers enacted on stage. This course will explore what it means to make something taboo (in 1600 and today) and will investigate the role of performance and drama in taboo-ifiying. How do we decide what is just ‘bad form,’ and what’s really unspeakably wrong? Do those unspeakable, unimaginable evils change over time, and if so, how? How can these things be performed onstage when they can barely be talked about? This course will include performance workshops, film screenings and (of course) readings of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporaries (Marlowe, Webster, Middleton, and Ford). We’ll also voyage downtown to attend at least one reading and one performance of plays from this period.

NY IN ART AND FILM (CLOSED!)

Ted Barrow

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From its earliest days as a pre-Hollywood hub of film studios, New York City has played a central role in film in the 20th century, one which corresponds directly to the production of modern art. In this course, comparisons between art-making and film-making will be made, while students will also be introduced to the core literature of modernist writing. Breaking up into four different periods: 1890-The Great Depression, WWII - the early 60's, the 60's and 70's, and finally the post-modern era of art and film, each week will focus on a group of artists or directors (including D.H Griffith, The Ashcan School, Diego Rivera, Sergei Eisenstein, Joseph Cornell, Andy Warhol, Martin Scorsese, and Julian Schnabel) who explore the intersection of art and film, particularly in New York City.

 

Writing:

FICTION INTENSIVE WORKSHOP (CLOSED!)

Jill DiDonato

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

This class is intended for those who have already written fiction in their high school classes or in their spare time, and who are interested in focusing on the practice of writing and revision through an intensive writing workshop. The core of this course is a writing workshop in which students will read and discuss stories their peers have written for this class. Students will receive detailed feedback on their stories from their peers, as well as from the instructor, and will then revise and polish these stories by the end of the course. We will examine published work to see how writers develop characters, plots, and settings, and we will take trips around the city to inspire creativity and to open students' eyes to new ways of writing. We will also attend a reading by a published author.

WRITING PLACE: NEW YORK CITY

Mary Roma

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

What makes New York the city we know, or believe, it to be? This course offers students opportunities to look into this question, making observations and using them to inquire into the variety of ways in which people find a place for themselves in this city. As we do so, we will become more adept writers, practicing skills and deepening our thinking about our notions of home, citizenship, and the city. The class will consider a variety of sources – fictional, non-fictional, film, personal experience – and will draft and revise short essays on the urban experience. The course will appeal both to students who already consider themselves writers, and those who can’t imagine doing so!

WRITING OUR LIVES: WRITING MEMOIR AND PERSONAL NARRATIVE (CLOSED!)

Jill DiDonato

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

The writer Anais Nin once wrote, “And then the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.” As the high school student prepares to make the transition from high school to college, she is faced with many challenges. One of these challenges is finding a personal voice and telling a unique story. This is a course designed to help young writers take on the risks of writing memoir and personal narrative. Through use of the writing and revision process as a way to overcome perfection-striving, and use of a collaborative learning model to dispel competition, and through reading the work of luminary writers, students in this course will find power in their experiences, build community among their peers, and gain a sense of academic ownership. As a course designed for the young student coming of age, "Writing Our Lives" offers students the opportunity of a public reading at a New York venue. By the end of the course, each student will have written, workshopped, and revised a personal narrative and will have the chance to share her narrative in a public space. 

SCREENWRITING: THE SHORT FORM

Helen Kaplan

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From film festivals to cell phones, short films are everywhere. This workshop will demystify the art of screenwriting and give you the tools you need to write a great short script. You will learn how to grab viewers by their collective shirt collar and, more importantly, hold their attention until the final credits roll. Emphasis will be placed on visual storytelling, the classic three-act structure, plot, character development, conflict, and dialogue. Through writing exercises, script analyses, and film screenings, students will learn the craft of screenwriting. By the end of the course, each student will have written three short screenplays as well as revised one of these scripts.

 

 

Courses by Time:   (back to the top)

Morning Courses (9:30am-12pm)                                                Afternoon Courses (2pm-4:30pm)
A Brief History of Evil The Rigor and Romance of Dance
Introduction to Screenwriting Exploring Global Perspectives
Writing Place: Home and City Religion, Literature, and Love
Acting: Process and Performance Filmmaking: From Script to Screen
Psych 101 Psychology of Media
Writing our Lives: Women Writing Memoir and Personal Narrative Journalism and Politics in the Digital Age
Masterpieces of Art in NYC

America in the World: US Politics and Government in Comparitive Perspective

NY in Art and Film Making Contemporary Art NYC
Architectural Culture and NYC Design Studio Fiction Intensive: Writing Workshop
Crime and Society Human Rights in World Literature
Sex and Betrayal: The Renaissance Taboo