Summer in the City

 

Students select two courses, a morning class and an afternoon class to be attended Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. On Wednesdays, students participate in our Beyond the Gates Series.

Please note that our programs admit students on a rolling basis. The application has been open since January and programs which are still open may close shortly.  We cannot guarantee spaces for applicants who may have begun applications but have not completed prior to the close of a program. 

Additionally, please note that certain classes are full

Summer 2016 Pre-College Courses 

Choose an area of interest: 

Acting

Architecture

Art History

Astronomy Dance Environmental Science Filmmaking
History Human Rights

Journalism

Literature

Neuroscience

Political Science Psychology
Religion

STEM

Studio Art Theatre Web Development Women's Studies Writing

Choose a class time (Morning or Afternoon)


Acting:

ACTING: PROCESS AND PERFORMANCE 

Ari Kreith & Todd Flaherty

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

New York's vibrant theatre scene is in our classroom! Students will hone their acting technique while deepening their understanding of the process of developing plays. We will rehearse and perform monologues and scenes and have the option to write short plays and/or perform songs. These hands-on opportunities will alternate with trips to the theatre, a Broadway backstage tour, and visits from guest artists including actors, directors, and playwrights. Students may also perform monologues for their peers at the end of the summer at the PCP Festival of the Arts.

 

Architecture:

ARCHITECTURAL CULTURE AND NYC DESIGN STUDIO 

Marcelo Lopez-Dinardi

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

Architecture is a key component of our built environment in many ways -- we live and work in buildingsArchitecture is the design that surrounds us, but also the relations between our hand-size design objects and our city-wide aspirations. This course will take the form of an architectural studio and seminar, with the fascinating city of New York as its context. We will have our own studio space at Barnard and will visit the city to confirm and test our in-house speculations. NYC will provide the background to develop a small project similar to those in an architectural studio course, and it will also be the place where we develop our sketchbooks, explore architecture with photography, and discuss our readings about architecture. No particular skills or previous knowledge is required to dive into the architectural culture and work within a studio environment.

 

Art History:

MASTERPIECES OF ART IN NEW YORK CITY 

Kent Minturn

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

This course will introduce students to some of the major works of Western Art currently located in New York. We will begin with the Greek period and conclude with the contemporary art scene in Chelsea. Slide lectures, class discussions, and readings will be supplemented with visits to New York City's world-renowned museums.

NEW YORK IN ART AND FILM 

Ted Barrow

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From its early days as a pre-Hollywood hub of film studios, New York City has played a central role in film in the 20th century, one which corresponds directly to the production of modern art.  In this course, comparisons between art-making and film-making will be made, while students will also be introduced to the core literature of modernist writing.  Dividing the curriculum into four different periods: 1890-The Great Depression, WWII-the early 60's, the 60's and 70's, and finally the post-modern era of art and film, each week we will focus on a group of artists or directors (including D.H. Griffith, The Ashcan School, Diego Rivera, Sergei Eisenstein, Joseph Cornell, Andy Warhol, Martin Scorsese, and Julian Schnabel) who explore the intersection of art and film, particularly in New York City.

 

Astronomy:

THE EXPLORATION OF SPACE

Frederic Stark

Afternoon (2-4:30pm)

For millennia, humans gazed in wonder at the stars.  Every culture developed its own mythology and stories to make sense of the pictures and patterns hidden in the night sky.  Then, in the last century, something amazing happened.  Our technology caught up to our wonder, and we learned how, in the words of John Magee, to “slip the surly bonds of Earth.”  For the past 58 years, some of our most clever little machines and intrepid explorers have helped us dip our toes into the vast cosmic ocean that surrounds our little blue marble of a home.  In this course, we will study the people, science, and technology that have brought humanity some of its most captivating and unifying moments from Isaac Newton to Neil Armstrong, from Sputnik to New Horizons.  At the same time, we will also examine the social and political reasons why we expend resources and effort to send those machines and people into space in the first place, and how we may, if we are careful enough, one day evolve into a truly spacefaring civilization.

 

Environmental Science:

BSI: NEW YORK

Joe Liddicoat

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

BSI: New York (Brownfield Site Investigation: New York) is a course in environmental discovery that combines scientific knowledge, constructionist education philosophy, and multimedia to explore a fictitious brownfield.  A brownfield is property that had prior industrial use which resulted in pollution of the property and surrounding region.  Central to the course is an innovative web-based simulation called Brownfield Action that was developed at Barnard and Columbia University and has a 10-year history of use by Barnard students and other students around the country.  Like real-world environmental consultants, you will develop and apply expertise from a wide range of fields, including environmental science, engineering, journalism, medicine, public health, law, civics, economics, organic and nuclear chemistry, and business management.  A directed reading of Jonathan Harr’s A Civil Action is the text for the course. 

 

Filmmaking:

SCREENWRITING: THE SHORT FORM 

Helen Kaplan

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From film festivals to cell phones, short films are everywhere. This workshop will demystify the art of screenwriting and give you the tools you need to write a great short script. You will learn how to grab viewers by their collective shirt collar and more importantly, hold their attention until the final credits roll. Emphasis will be placed on visual storytelling, the classic three-act structure, plot, character development, conflict, and dialogue. Through writing exercises, script analyses, and film screenings, students will learn the craft of screenwriting. By the end of the course, each student will have written two short screenplays as well as revised one of these scripts.

THE SHORT FILM: FROM SCRIPT TO SCREEN 

Helen Kaplan

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

In this immersive filmmaking course, you will develop your visual storytelling skills by using only imagery and sound (and no dialogue) to create a short film. You will dream up screen stories and get your ideas down on the page during pre-production. You will shoot and direct your cast, bringing your words and images to life during production. And finally, you will edit your footage into an original short film during post-production. Since film is a collaborative medium, students will crew, act, produce, and shoot each other’s projects in order to experience all aspects of filmmaking. Using New York as both a set and a source of inspiration, students will also attend film screenings and visit organizations that promote and produce cinema. Previous experience shooting and editing is highly recommended.
 
 

History:

THE EXPLORATION OF SPACE

Frederic Stark

Afternoon (2-4:30pm)

For millennia, humans gazed in wonder at the stars.  Every culture developed its own mythology and stories to make sense of the pictures and patterns hidden in the night sky.  Then, in the last century, something amazing happened.  Our technology caught up to our wonder, and we learned how, in the words of John Magee, to “slip the surly bonds of Earth.”  For the past 58 years, some of our most clever little machines and intrepid explorers have helped us dip our toes into the vast cosmic ocean that surrounds our little blue marble of a home.  In this course, we will study the people, science, and technology that have brought humanity some of its most captivating and unifying moments from Isaac Newton to Neil Armstrong, from Sputnik to New Horizons.  At the same time, we will also examine the social and political reasons why we expend resources and effort to send those machines and people into space in the first place, and how we may, if we are careful enough, one day evolve into a truly spacefaring civilization.

THE HISTORY OF HUMAN RIGHTS (CLOSED!)

Roz Myers

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

Human rights have taken on greater importance since the turn of the millennium. The concept seems “self evident” to most citizens of modern democracies, yet its origins and its meaning are elusive even to those who most support its ideals. What is a “human right”? How did this philosophical principle become embedded in international law? Why and when did “human rights” emerge at the center of our moral consciousness? This class will explore the origins of the concept of human rights, its relationship to other philosophies of law, and global social issues, such as genocide, terrorism, and the security of nations and individuals. An understanding of human rights will be drawn primarily from American social institutions, relying on legal case examples, the role of media, political discourse, and other widely known illustrations. Active class discussion, critical thinking, and the oral and written expression of ideas will be emphasized. Whatever perspective(s) you bring to the class, expect to be challenged regularly. Although your personal experience will inform your views in every class discussion, please remember that our class discussions are not personal. You might disagree with the opinions being offered in the class, but we can acknowledge and respectfully discuss all points of view.

NEW YORK IN ART AND FILM 

Ted Barrow

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From its early days as a pre-Hollywood hub of film studios, New York City has played a central role in film in the 20th century, one which corresponds directly to the production of modern art.  In this course, comparisons between art-making and film-making will be made, while students will also be introduced to the core literature of modernist writing.  Breaking up into four different periods: 1890-The Great Depression, WWII-the early 60's, the 60's and 70's, and finally the post-modern era of art and film, each week will focus on a group of artists or directors (including D.H. Griffith, The Ashcan School, Diego Rivera, Sergei Eisenstein, Joseph Cornell, Andy Warhol, Martin Scorsese, and Julian Schnabel) who explore the intersection of art and film, particularly in New York City.

 

Human Rights:

THE HISTORY OF HUMAN RIGHTS (CLOSED!)

Roz Myers

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

Human rights have taken on greater importance since the turn of the millennium. The concept seems “self evident” to most citizens of modern democracies, yet its origins and its meaning are elusive even to those who most support its ideals. What is a “human right”? How did this philosophical principle become embedded in international law? Why and when did “human rights” emerge at the center of our moral consciousness? This class will explore the origins of the concept of human rights, its relationship to other philosophies of law, and global social issues, such as genocide, terrorism, and the security of nations and individuals. An understanding of human rights will be drawn primarily from American social institutions, relying on legal case examples, the role of media, political discourse, and other widely known illustrations. Active class discussion, critical thinking, and the oral and written expression of ideas will be emphasized. Whatever perspective(s) you bring to the class, expect to be challenged regularly. Although your personal experience will inform your views in every class discussion, please remember that our class discussions are not personal. You might disagree with the opinions being offered in the class, but we can acknowledge and respectfully discuss all points of view.

 

Journalism:

AMERICAN POLITICAL COMMUNICATION 

Andi Dixon

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

This course addresses political communication in the American context (focusing on the federal level), and examines the activities and constituencies of key actors, including politicians, institutions, the media and American publics. This course serves as an introduction to and a broad survey of political communication, an interdisciplinary field at the intersection of communication studies, political science, sociology, media studies and journalism. In this class, we will assess political communication as a major sub-field of communication studies, examining key works that address political actors’ use of mediated and fundamentally communicative public practices to bolster narratives, create consensus, and allocate power and resources. Major topics covered will include the following: public sphere and public opinion; propaganda and public relations; presidential rhetoric; electoral politics and campaigning; journalism, the news and public life; research on media and new media effects; mediation of identity politics (age, religion, race, gender and sexual orientation); and, political advocacy, civic engagement and social movements.

JOURNALISM AND POLITICS IN THE DIGITAL AGE  

Burcu Baykurt

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

Digital technology is challenging and changing established journalistic and political institutions on a number of fronts, from the increasing use of data in journalism to the movements such as “Occupy” and the “Arab Spring” to the relatively recent Snowden leaks. This course will explore the digital transformations in journalism and politics along with the consequences of our widespread use of the Internet. What constitutes journalism in an era when anyone with a phone camera and Internet connection can engage in those acts? What level of political knowledge and participation should we expect of citizens, and how do digital media facilitate those levels? This course will provide excellent preparation for students interested in journalism and media studies as well as related fields such as political communications and media policy. With visits to New York City-based newsrooms, digital media companies, and advocacy organizations, we will collectively chart out what kind of roles and responsibilities citizens have in the era of digital media and politics.

 

Literature:

GENDER, RACE, AND JANE AUSTEN

Candace Cunard

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

Today, Jane Austen’s novels are often read as “romances”—not just because they are love stories, but because they allow readers to escape into a romanticized past, free from supposedly modern “political” issues like sexism and racism. But in fact, during her lifetime, Austen witnessed major developments in the push for women’s rights and the abolition of slavery, and her novels reflect her deep awareness of the politics of her age. Austen’s Mansfield Park and Amma Asante’s 2013 film Belle will function as central texts for this course, but we will read them alongside selections from foundational feminist texts, abolitionist poetry, autobiographies of formerly enslaved Africans, and short works of fiction representing women and people of color in order to develop an intersectional approach to issues of gender and race in the late eighteenth century. This approach will allow us to think about the relative power of fictional and non-fictional texts as vehicles for making political arguments. What methods of persuasion—logic, sympathy, factual evidence—do different writers use to make convincing political claims? What role does a writer’s gender and/or racial identity play in her decision to use a specific genre for political purposes? What does it even mean for a novel to be “political,” and how do novelists use the elements of fiction—including character, pacing, point of view, and literary style—to make and to support political points? And, ultimately, how do the tactics used by writers and activists over 200 years ago help us to understand and reflect on the tactics used by writers and activists today?

MEMORY, LONGING, AND IDENTITY IN WORLD LITERATURE

James Reich

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

Memory is a daily part of human life. But it is more complex than it seems, and more mysterious. There are many different ways to remember, and to misremember, and many ways to forget. Memory can be shared. It can be sustained or repressed. It can be fought over and fought against and passed on. It is central to our knowledge of who we are and where we are going. And, perhaps surprisingly, it has been portrayed in literature as closely connected to our experience of yearning and our experience of beauty. In this course, we will read plays, poems, and stories from around the world that deal with these themes of remembering, forgetting, loving, longing, and knowing oneself. We will explore what it means to remember and what it means to forget, and also what these have meant in different cultures and different centuries.

NEW YORK IN ART AND FILM 

Ted Barrow

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From its early days as a pre-Hollywood hub of film studios, New York City has played a central role in film in the 20th century, one which corresponds directly to the production of modern art.  In this course, comparisons between art-making and film-making will be made, while students will also be introduced to the core literature of modernist writing.  Breaking up into four different periods: 1890-The Great Depression, WWII-the early 60's, the 60's and 70's, and finally the post-modern era of art and film, each week will focus on a group of artists or directors (including D.H. Griffith, The Ashcan School, Diego Rivera, Sergei Eisenstein, Joseph Cornell, Andy Warhol, Martin Scorsese, and Julian Schnabel) who explore the intersection of art and film, particularly in New York City.

 

Neuroscience:

INTRODUCTION TO NEUROSCIENCE (CLOSED!)

Leigh Boyd

Afternoon (2-4:30pm) 

Ever wonder why your crazy Aunt Mary acts so out of it? Or why people get so addicted to cocaine and other drugs? Or why you always seem to forget things when you’re stressed? These questions have one thing in common: the brain. Our brains are complex systems that oversee almost every aspect of our lives, from basic functions like breathing to higher level thinking to the way we pick our favorite bands. In this course, we will study the brain and its functions, including neurons, common neurotransmitters, and how problems with the brain can affect a person’s behaviors. No background in biology or chemistry is needed, as this is an entry-level course.

 

Political Science:

AMERICAN POLITICAL COMMUNICATION 

Andi Dixon

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

This course addresses political communication in the American context (focusing on the federal level), and examines the activities and constituencies of key actors, including politicians, institutions, the media and American publics. This course serves as an introduction to and a broad survey of political communication, an interdisciplinary field at the intersection of communication studies, political science, sociology, media studies and journalism. In this class, we will assess political communication as a major sub-field of communication studies, examining key works that address political actors’ use of mediated and fundamentally communicative public practices to bolster narratives, create consensus, and allocate power and resources. Major topics covered will include the following: public sphere and public opinion; propaganda and public relations; presidential rhetoric; electoral politics and campaigning; journalism, the news and public life; research on media and new media effects; mediation of identity politics (age, religion, race, gender and sexual orientation); and, political advocacy, civic engagement and social movements.

JOURNALISM AND POLITICS IN THE DIGITAL AGE  

Burcu Baykurt

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

Digital technology is challenging and changing established journalistic and political institutions on a number of fronts, from the increasing use of data in journalism to the movements such as “Occupy” and the “Arab Spring” to the relatively recent Snowden leaks. This course will explore the digital transformations in journalism and politics along with the consequences of our widespread use of the Internet. What constitutes journalism in an era when anyone with a phone camera and Internet connection can engage in those acts? What level of political knowledge and participation should we expect of citizens, and how do digital media facilitate those levels? This course will provide excellent preparation for students interested in journalism and media studies as well as related fields such as political communications and media policy. With visits to New York City-based newsrooms, digital media companies, and advocacy organizations, we will collectively chart out what kind of roles and responsibilities citizens have in the era of digital media and politics.

 

Psychology:

PSYCH 101  (CLOSED!)

Jamie Krenn

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

Psychology can be defined as the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. While psychology is most often associated with clinical issues (i.e. abnormal, personality), this makes up only a small portion of the field. This is a broad survey course covering topics such as physiological, social, organizational, and developmental psychology. The course will develop one’s understanding of seeing psychology as a science of human thought and behavior. Topics covered will be a helpful tool for most university introductory psychology courses.

PSYCHOLOGY OF MEDIA  (closed!)

Jamie Krenn

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

Explore the psychology behind media and how it affects you, your peers and the public at large.  If this sounds right up your blog — our course will examine the internet, mobile media, video games and how learning and media go hand in hand to facilitate understanding and decision-making.  You will be introduced to psychological theories and research, and the cognitive processes of media development. Guest speakers will include a casting professional from Sesame Street, a curriculum consultant from Nick, Jr, an advertising executive and others.

 

Religion:

RELIGIONS OF NEW YORK

Liz Dolfi & Andrew Junclaus

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

Religion is and has been central to the diverse historical and social worlds of New York City. This course will use the City as its textbook in exploring the negotiations between historical traditions and contemporary practice. We will make twice-weekly visits to “religious” field sites both expected and surprising. We will visit historic worship spaces, the Guggenheim Museum, a local yoga studio, the American Museum of Natural History, traditional ritual sites, and religious street festivals. Major themes in this course will include religion’s role in American history, lived religion, popular religious practice, and the politics of representing and displaying the sacred. Students will gain facility with religious concepts from a variety of traditions, such as Islam, Judaism, mainline Protestantism, Roman Catholicism, Native American traditions, and contemporary spiritualities. Class readings, documentaries, lectures, and in-depth discussions will give students context for their experiences and introduce them to the ways in which religion haunts the landscape and history of New York City.

 

STEM:

BSI: NEW YORK

Joe Liddicoat

Afternoon (2-4:30pm)

BSI: New York (Brownfield Site Investigation: New York) is a course in environmental discovery that combines scientific knowledge, constructionist education philosophy, and multimedia to explore a fictitious brownfield.  A brownfield is property that had prior industrial use which resulted in pollution of the property and surrounding region.  Central to the course is an innovative web-based simulation called Brownfield Action that was developed at Barnard and Columbia University and has a 10-year history of use by Barnard students and other students around the country.  Like real-world environmental consultants, you will develop and apply expertise from a wide range of fields, including environmental science, engineering, journalism, medicine, public health, law, civics, economics, organic and nuclear chemistry, and business management.  A directed reading of Jonathan Harr’s A Civil Action is the text for the course. 

THE EXPLORATION OF SPACE

Frederic Stark

Afternoon (2-4:30pm)

For millennia, humans gazed in wonder at the stars.  Every culture developed its own mythology and stories to make sense of the pictures and patterns hidden in the night sky.  Then, in the last century, something amazing happened.  Our technology caught up to our wonder, and we learned how, in the words of John Magee, to “slip the surly bonds of Earth.”  For the past 58 years, some of our most clever little machines and intrepid explorers have helped us dip our toes into the vast cosmic ocean that surrounds our little blue marble of a home.  In this course, we will study the people, science, and technology that have brought humanity some of its most captivating and unifying moments from Isaac Newton to Neil Armstrong, from Sputnik to New Horizons.  At the same time, we will also examine the social and political reasons why we expend resources and effort to send those machines and people into space in the first place, and how we may, if we are careful enough, one day evolve into a truly spacefaring civilization.

INTRODUCTION TO NEUROSCIENCE (CLOSED!)

Leigh Boyd

Afternoon (2-4:30pm)

Ever wonder why your crazy Aunt Mary acts so out of it? Or why people get so addicted to cocaine and other drugs? Or why you always seem to forget things when you’re stressed? These questions have one thing in common: the brain. Our brains are complex systems that oversee almost every aspect of our lives, from basic functions like breathing to higher level thinking to the way we pick our favorite bands. In this course, we will study the brain and its functions, including neurons, common neurotransmitters, and how problems with the brain can affect a person’s behaviors. No background in biology or chemistry is needed, as this is an entry-level course.

INTRODUCTION TO WEB DEVELOPMENT

Courtney Yadoo

Morning (9:30am-12pm)

From communication to sports and fashion, computer programs touch nearly every part of our lives. It’s no surprise that coding is one of the most important and valuable skills for 21st century success. This immersive course will introduce you to the same programming skills that professional developers use to build today's most popular websites. You will learn the fundamentals of web design and development using HTML and CSS, the markup languages that are the building blocks of the web.  You will learn by coding each day, and, by the end of this hands-on course, you will understand the structural foundation and styling of websites and have the opportunity to develop your own web project.

ISSUES IN WOMEN'S HEALTH (CLOSED!)

Jocelyn Killmer

Morning (9:30am-12pm)

This course explores social and political aspects of women’s health. Why do biology textbooks portray eggs as passive and sperm as active? How did toilets become a women’s rights issue? Have increasing numbers of women doctors made healthcare better for women and girls? Calling upon scholarly articles, popular media, and lively discussion, we will consider these topics and more, including: menstrual taboos, testosterone and girls’ sports, the history of hysteria and “wandering wombs,” childbirth rituals, women’s health activism, and health disparities based on gender and race. We will take field trips to the New York Academy of Medicine, the Central Park statue of the controversial “father of gynecology” J. Marion Sims, and the Museum of the City of New York’s Activist NY exhibit.

 

Studio Art:

CONTEMPORARY ART STUDIO 

Julia Westerbeke

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm)

New York City has one of the largest and most influential art communities in the world, which is why it can be such an inspiring and productive place for a young artist. Through trips to contemporary art galleries and museums, visits with practicing artists, creative workshops, readings and in-depth discussions, students will gain an understanding of the art world and what it is like to make work within this diverse and creative community. Students will execute creative assignments based on ideas that we have discussed and experienced during the course. An emphasis will be placed on experimental art projects (including collage, mixed-media and installation art).  Our focus will be contemporary art in the city today and how it relates to historic art movements of the 20th century, among them Surrealism, Appropriation Art, and Pop Art. The course will culminate in an exhibition of student work at the McCagg Gallery on Barnard campus.

 

Theatre:

NEW YORK IN ART AND FILM

Ted Barrow

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From its early days as a pre-Hollywood hub of film studios, New York City has played a central role in film in the 20th century, one which corresponds directly to the production of modern art.  In this course, comparisons between art-making and film-making will be made, while students will also be introduced to the core literature of modernist writing.  Breaking up into four different periods: 1890-The Great Depression, WWII-the early 60's, the 60's and 70's, and finally the post-modern era of art and film, each week will focus on a group of artists or directors (including D.H. Griffith, The Ashcan School, Diego Rivera, Sergei Eisenstein, Joseph Cornell, Andy Warhol, Martin Scorsese, and Julian Schnabel) who explore the intersection of art and film, particularly in New York City.

 

Web Development:

WEB DEVELOPMENT

Courtney Yadoo

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From communication to sports and fashion, computer programs touch nearly every part of our lives. It’s no surprise that coding is one of the most important and valuable skills for 21st century success. This immersive course will introduce you to the same programming skills that professional developers use to build today's most popular websites. You will learn the fundamentals of web design and development using HTML and CSS, the markup languages that are the building blocks of the web.  You will learn by coding each day, and, by the end of this hands-on course, you will understand the structural foundation and styling of websites and have the opportunity to develop your own web project.

 

Women's Studies:

ISSUES IN WOMEN'S HEALTH (CLOSED!)

Jocelyn Killmer

Morning (9:30am-12pm)

This course explores social and political aspects of women’s health. Why do biology textbooks portray eggs as passive and sperm as active? How did toilets become a women’s rights issue? Have increasing numbers of women doctors made healthcare better for women and girls? Calling upon scholarly articles, popular media, and lively discussion, we will consider these topics and more, including: menstrual taboos, testosterone and girls’ sports, the history of hysteria and “wandering wombs,” childbirth rituals, women’s health activism, and health disparities based on gender and race. We will take field trips to the New York Academy of Medicine, the Central Park statue of the controversial “father of gynecology” J. Marion Sims, and the Museum of the City of New York’s Activist NY exhibit.

 

Writing:

WRITING OUR LIVES: WRITING MEMOIR AND PERSONAL NARRATIVE  (CLOSED!)

Jill DiDonato

Afternoon (2pm-4:30pm) 

The writer Anais Nin once wrote, “And then the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.” As the high school student prepares to make the transition from high school to college, she is faced with many challenges. One of these challenges is finding a personal voice and telling a unique story. This is a course designed to help young writers take on the risks of writing memoir and personal narrative. Through use of the writing and revision process as a way to overcome perfection-striving, use of a collaborative learning model to dispel competition, and through reading the work of luminary writers, students in this course will find power in their experiences, build community among their peers, and gain a sense of academic ownership. As a course designed for the young student coming of age, "Writing Our Lives" offers students the opportunity of a public reading at a New York venue. By the end of the course, each student will have written, workshopped, and revised a personal narrative and will have the chance to share her narrative in a public space. 

WRITING PLACE: COMPOSING PROFILES OF NEW YORKERS

Mary Roma

Morning (9:30am-12pm)

Broadway show superfans, buskers, comedy improvisers, Greenwich Village chess aficionados, NBC pages, sneakerheads, handball players—these are just a few of the unique subcultures and micro communities that bring vibrancy and culture to New York City.  Why and in what way is New York able to breed and feed them? What is complex, intriguing and surprising about these New Yorkers, especially in their connections to each other and this city?  By borrowing techniques of characterization and storytelling from fiction and learning some interviewing and research skills from journalism, students in this creative non-fiction writing class will craft portraits of these subjects without exploiting or romanticizing them.  Students will write one profile, and build on that into a longer draft of a paper, which will be expanded on in revisions and workshopped in the class with feedback from the instructor and other students.  We will read examples of literary journalism from Susan Orlean, Jeff Chang and others, and view some classic New York documentaries. There will be field trips, including excursions to Chelsea, home of Upright Citizen’s Brigade Improv Theater, and to Greenwich Village, the East Village, and Brooklyn.

SCREENWRITING: THE SHORT FORM 

Helen Kaplan

Morning (9:30am-12pm) 

From film festivals to cell phones, short films are everywhere. This workshop will demystify the art of screenwriting and give you the tools you need to write a great short script. You will learn how to grab viewers by their collective shirt collar and more importantly, hold their attention until the final credits roll. Emphasis will be placed on visual storytelling, the classic three-­act structure, plot, character development, conflict, and dialogue. Through writing exercises, script analyses, and film screenings, students will learn the craft of screenwriting. By the end of the course, each student will have written two short screenplays as well as revised one of these scripts.

 

 

Courses by Time:   (back to the top)

Morning Courses (9:30am-12pm)                                                Afternoon Courses (2pm-4:30pm)
Architectural Culture and NYC Design Studio Acting: Process and Performance
The History of Human Rights (CLOSED!) American Political Communication (CLOSED!)
Introduction to Web Development BSI: New York
Issues in Women's Health  (CLOSED!) Contemporary Art Studio
Masterpieces of Art in NYC

The Exploration of Space

Memory, Longing, and Identity in World Literature Filmmaking: From Script to Screen
New York in Art and Film Gender, Race, and Jane Austen
Psych 101  (CLOSED!) Introduction to Neuroscience (CLOSED!)
Religions of NY Journalism and Politics in the Digital Age
Screenwriting: The Short Form

Psychology of Media (closed!)

Writing Place: Composing New Yorkers in Profile Writing our Lives: Writing Memoir and Personal Narrative (CLOSED!)