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neurology

Join The Hughes Science Pipeline Project and the Barnard Center for Research on Women for the 19th annual Distinguished Women in Science Lecture. 

Throughout the years, Barnard women have studied such sciences as astronomy, biology, chemistry, and physics, pursuing careers in these fields. Many of these women were pioneers, establishing their places within scientific communities that were all but closed to them. On the following pages, six alumnae, two of whom are retired, talk about their research, how they started, and what inspired them.

Dr. Rae Silver, head of the Laboratory of Neurobiology and Behavior at Columbia University and Helene L. and Mark N. Kaplan Professor at Barnard College, is studying what makes the master clock in our brain tick. Working to help advance Dr. Silver’s research are Megan Manganaro ’10 and Akhila Iyer ’10, Barnard students majoring in neuroscience and behavior.

When asked if he always wanted to be a scientist, Russell D. Romeo answers instantly and without equivocation: "Absolutely not. When I arrived at college, I planned to major in music theory and train as a classical guitarist."

But Edinboro University's first-year courses in psychology, sociology, anthropology, and philosophy introduced him to the study of human behavior and the workings of the brain.
"For me, the combination of those courses was the perfect storm of getting interested in the mind," Romeo recalls. "I decided I didn't want to be a starving artist my whole life. I decided to be a starving scientist instead."

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