lecture

A renowned poet and critic, and one of the most important translators of modern French poetry, Serge Gavronsky has taught in the French Department at Barnard College for over 50 years.

Please join us to celebrate his illustrious career.

Judith Butler examines how Euripedes’ Bacchae provides insight into new forms of kinship, multiple parenting, and primary relations that exceed and confound biological and marital bonds.

Anna Hallberg, Jörgen Gassilewski, and Johannes Göransson read and discuss their works within the context of contemporary Swedish poetry. Moderated by Elizabeth Clark Wessel, English-language translator of the poetry of Anna Hallberg.

Using Ellis Island documents and other institutional archival records, Ramona Hernández, director of the Dominican Studies Institute of the City University of New York, paints a compelling portrait of Dominicans who wanted to make New York their permanent home.

Raanan Rein examines the history of two soccer clubs to demonstrate how club membership can sustain distinct ethnic identities and facilitate integration into the local society.

Michael Kimmelman, architecture critic for The New York Times, explores “the political power of physical places” evident in locations from Tahrir Square to Zuccotti Park.

Join Marion Nestle, Distinguished Women in Science lecturer, for a discussion of the science and politics behind what we eat.

Former Assistant Secretary of Education Diane Ravitch tackles one of the most provocative issues in education today: What’s behind the trend to close low-scoring schools and turn them over to private managers?

Anindita Banerjee will discuss two translations of an unusual text of the 15th century — the travelogue of a Russian merchant, which is punctuated and even overwhelmed by its religious invocations to Allah and the Prophet Mohammed.