Liberal Arts Intensive

Sunday, July 8 - Friday, July 13, 2018

Students choose one class for the duration of the 1-week program to be attended 9:30 am - 12:30 pm, Monday through Friday. Afternoons are an opportunity to complete assignments and engage in on and off campus activities, including Broadway shows, baseball games, exercise classes, and so much more! We will also be offering optional afternoon activities to include museum trips, walking tours, and visits to science centers.  

Program Features...

  • Morning Course
  • Seminar and Lecture Style Courses
  • Optional Add-On Programs
  • Flexible schedule
  • Evening and Weekend Excursions
  • Residential or Commuter Options

Summer 2018 Courses

Choose an area of interest:

The Arts
History
Urban Studies
Psychology
STEM
Writing


 

Course Listings:

The Arts

FEMINIST ART IN NEW YORK CITY

Erica Cardwell

In this course, we will examine New York as an epicenter for feminist art and history. We will visit feminist cultural institutions such as the Elizabeth Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum and the Lesbian Herstory Archive. Our goal is to sharpen our understanding of feminist art and space from an intersectional framework of race, class, sex, gender - essentially, our everyday lives. Students will write a short paper examining three pieces of feminist art. As a class, we will collaborate on a zine (or make individual zines) focused on significant elements of intersectional feminism and visual art.

NEW YORK IN ART AND FILM

Ted Barrow

From its early days as a pre-Hollywood hub of film studios, New York City has played a central role in film in the 20th century, one which corresponds directly to the production of modern art. In this week-long course, the relationship between art-making and film-making will be explored, while students will also be introduced to the core literature of modernist writing. Breaking up into four different periods: 1890-The Great Depression, WWII-the early 60's, the 60's and 70's, and finally the contemporary era of art and film, particularly in New York City. This promises to be a dynamic week of film screenings, gallery and museum visits, walking tours, and in-class discussion.

History

NEW YORK IN ART AND FILM

Ted Barrow

From its early days as a pre-Hollywood hub of film studios, New York City has played a central role in film in the 20th century, one which corresponds directly to the production of modern art. In this week-long course, the relationship between art-making and film-making will be explored, while students will also be introduced to the core literature of modernist writing. Breaking up into four different periods: 1890-The Great Depressions, WWII-the early 60's, the 60's and 70's, and finally the contemporary era of art and film, each day will focus on a group of artists or directors who explore the intersection of art and film, particularly in New York City. This promises to be a dynamic week of film screenings, gallery and museum visits, walking tours, and in-class discussion.

TECHNICALLY HUMAN: RACE, GENDER, AND BELONGING IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Yuliya Grinberg

What can Amazon's Alexa or IBM's Watson tell us about what it means to be human? Contemporary computers and artificial intelligence systems have ushered in fresh enthusiam and fear about the intersection of people and technology. Rather than take it for granted that technology either enables or threatens humanity, we will think more broadly about recent social history of human-machine entanglements and the forms of otherness they have produced. Moving through readings in the history of science and technology, anthropology, philosophy, and sociology this course will introduce students to ways of thinking about the racial, gendered, and technical imaginaries that variously shape what can be seen as technology and whom to count as human.

Psychology

PSYCHOLOGY OF CHILDREN'S MEDIA

Natasha Crandall

Everyone knows how much fun it is to watch television. This is true for people of all ages, including young children. What was your favorite show as a child? Did you know that most preschool television shows use psychologists to ensure that it is teaching and modeling age appropriate concepts? Now that there are apps and digital games for young children, psychologists are involved in the creation of these as well. Get an inside look at how psychologists influence today’s media. You will hear from speakers who work in television as well as in digital media and will get to participate in a focus group to learn first-hand how psychologists determine if shows are as educational as they claim to be.

STEM

NYC NATURE: FROM THE RIVER TO THE ROOFTOPS

Terryanne Maenza-Gmelch

In NYC Nature: From the River to the Rooftops, students will explore NYC's nature as found in the Hudson River to the wildflower meadows planted on top of Barnard College buildings. In addition to studying the microscopic life and water quality of the Hudson, students will measure carbon storage in campus trees, survey birds in Riverside Park, simulate a paleoecological investigation of Manhattan using the Virtual Forest and quantify biodiversity on NYC rooftops. It is an investigation of the city's wildlife, from plankton to peregrines, and will be hands-on, inquiry-based, include field experiences, and involve data collection, analysis, and presentations. Each meeting will begin with a discussion of the day's topic and then we will head outside to collect data, for example, water samples, tree measurements, wildflower and bird surveys, etc. Back in the lab, the data will be graphed and analyzed and be discussed in the form of team presentations.

TECHNICALLY HUMAN: RACE, GENDER, AND BELONGING IN THE DIGITAL AGE

Yuliya Grinberg

What can Amazon's Alexa or IBM's Watson tell us about what it means to be human? Contemporary computers and artificial intelligence systems have ushered in fresh enthusiam and fear about the intersection of people and technology. Rather than take it for granted that technology either enables or threatens humanity, we will think more broadly about recent social history of human-machine entanglements and the forms of otherness they have produced. Moving through readings in the history of science and technology, anthropology, philosophy, and sociology this course will introduce students to ways of thinking about the racial, gendered, and technical imaginaries that variously shape what can be seen as technology and whom to count as human.

THE ELEGANCE OF PHYSICS

Ric Stark

Physics is all around us. Gravity holds your feet to the ground, guides the planets in their orbits, and gives the universe its shape. Light from nuclear reactions deep inside the Sun warms the Earth and nourishes its life. Electricity and magnetism make our modern digital world possible. And without general relativity, the GPS app on your phone would be useless. Yet the word "physics" often unnecessarily conjures images of nothing but mind-numbing equations and incomprehensible gobbledygook. In this course, we will explore the fundamental principles and theories that have given us the ability to understand the universe in which we live. For those planning future studies in mathematically formalized physics, this course will serve to whet the appetite and provide a strong foundation in those fundamental principles. For others anticipating different academic pathways, this course will offer a glimpse into a fascinating world that will all too often seem impenetrable. For everyone, the course will bring physics to life, and, at the very least, explain all the obscure references on The Big Bang Theory!

Urban Studies

URBAN STUDIES: EXPLORING NEW YORK CITY NEIGHBORHOODS 

Elizabeth Pillsbury
In this course, the class will explore New York City neighborhoods to gain a better understanding of how cities operate. The class will use the urban landscape as its classroom, discussing the works of urban planners, theorists and fiction writers alongside historical newspaper articles and maps to examine how New York functions today and in the past. In explorations ranging from Barnard’s campus to the Lower East Side, the class will explore  factors that contribute to a neighborhood’s vitality and how one might build a more sustainable and equitable city. Students will soak in the city--  visiting the Highline, eating food in Chinatown, exploring Harlem and the financial district. Homework will include readings as well as urban explorations. By the end of the course, students should come away with new understanding of New York City and of cities in general.

 

Writing

PLACE AND THE PERSONAL ESSAY: BEING IN NEW YORK 

Thomas March

We learn more about who we are when we pay attention to how we react to the spaces around us (and the others who inhabit them)—whether bustling or calm, expansive or close, grand or intimate. In this course, students will explore the ways in which awareness of our relationships to spaces in New York—whether natural, architectural, or social—can form the basis of personal reflections on matters of importance to them. To supplement our work, we may read selections from the work of such writers as Joan Didion, James Baldwin, E. B. White, Alfred Kazin, Fran Lebowitz, Adam Gopnik, and Colson Whitehead, among others, to provoke further discussion of a variety of methods for capturing and celebrating spaces and their impacts. At the end of the week, each student will have written a personal, discursive essay inspired by  her experience of an inspiring space.

REWRITING OUR LIVES WITH THE LYRIC ESSAY

Caroline Hagood

"What if the poem and prose could part together and neither would regret it the next morning?"

-Amy Newman, "The Poem In The Gray Flannel Suit"

With its mixture of memoir, poetry, and essay forms, the lyric essay, or poetic essay, is a particularly exciting form of creative nonfiction. In this course we will consider what the lyric essay can do that a poem, memoir, or essay alone cannot. One of the works we will consider, Maggie Nelson's The Argonauts, is a stunningly personal piece that also poses larger political questions about love, sex, and gender. As a hybrid genre, the lyric essay forces us to make innovative connections, see things in a whole new light, rewrite our lives both personally and politically. The members of this workship will study the ins and outs of this ingenious form while crafting their own lyric essay. By the end of this course, students will have a submission-ready piece that will be the first step to a personal statement for college, a first published piece, or even a meaningful career as a writer.