caribbean, central and south america

caribbean, central and south america

The Forum on Migration welcomes David Cook-Martin for an exploration of the relationship between racism and political liberalism in the Americas.

José Shane Brownrigg-Gleeson considers how Irish loyalties to North and South American countries shaped their shifting identities and transformed the ethno-national images of Irish in the new world. 

Join Barnard's Office of International Programs for dinner and a film screening, followed by a discussion with artist Vik Muniz.

Barnard professors Kaiama Glover and Maja Horn discuss the commonality and conflict between Haiti and the Dominican Republic—two nations that share over five centuries of interconnected history, and yet remain deeply divided.

 

For The New York Times' "Room for Debate" forum, Barnard history professor Jose Moya writes about the future of the Falkland Islands, reflecting on the legacy of the late British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and citing similarities and differences with Hong Kong and Gibraltar.

 

João J. Reis, professor of history at the Universidade Federal da Bahia, discusses the ethnic origins, geographical distribution, and cultural contributions of Africans in Brazil.

 

In March, Barnard hosted the fifth annual global symposium Women Changing Brazil and the third annual Young Women's Leadership Workshop in São Paulo.

Shanna Lorenz, professor of music and Latino/a and Latin American Studies at Occidental College, explores how circular migration between Brazil and Japan has impacted Brazilian society.

 

Barnard’s faculty representatives will attend “Women Changing Brazil” in São Paulo, Brazil

 

Jeffrey Lesser, chair of the department of history at Emory University, examines the unique role of Arabs and Jews in Brazilian society.