history

history

Faustilla the Pawnbroker & Other Tales of Gender & Finance in the Early Roman Empire

A lecture by Kristina Milnor
Wednesday, October 23, 2013
12 PM
BCRW, 101 Barnard Hall

Join Associate Professor of Classics Kristina Milnor for a lunchtime lecture. Milnor will discuss female involvement in the public management of money during the first century of the Roman Empire. Sponsored by the Barnard Center for Research on Women.

Anthology co-edited by Prof. Hana Worthen explores Finland's Holocaust

Essay collection examines how modern Finnish memory and the writing of history have engaged and evaded both the history of antisemitism in Finland.

The Strategic Production of Chinese Immigrants as Model Minorities, 1948-1965

A lecture by Madeline Y. Hsu
Thursday, September 26, 2013
6 PM
Sulzberger Parlor, 3rd Floor Barnard Hall

Madeline Y. Hsu, director of the Center for Asian American Studies and associate professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin, explores how shifts in immigration laws and practices produced the idea of Chinese, and other Asian immigrants, as high-achieving “model minorities.”

Wagner's Jews

Screening and Panel Discussion
Sunday, September 22, 2013
4 PM
Event Oval

Hilan Warshaw's one-hour documentary examines the conflicting attitudes toward Jews held by the German opera composer, Richard Wagner.

100 Years of Charles Beard's An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution

A lecture by Herbert Sloan, professor of history
Tuesday, September 17, 2013
6 PM
Ella Weed Room, 2nd Floor Milbank Hall

Prof. Jonathan Rieder reflects on 50th anniversary of MLK's "I Have a Dream" speech

Sociology professor comments on King's legacy for The New Yorker, The Los Angeles Times, The Charlie Rose Show, and more.

Exhibition Explores Fashion in 1920s Shanghai

A fashion exhibition at the Museum of Chinese in America, curated with the expertise of Professor Dorothy Ko, tells the story of Shanghai’s “new woman.”

Fly Me to the Moon

Lily Koppel ’03 may have been just “moon dust”— as she jokes— during the great age of space exploration, but in her second book, The Astronaut Wives Club, the 32-year-old author deftly transports readers through that era, navigating territory that has seldom been traversed.

Marking 20 Years of Africana Studies

“There’s been a dramatic transformation,” says Professor Tina Campt. “There’s been the transformation of going from nothing to something.” She’s talking about the Africana Studies Program, which she directs—and which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year.