Sep 12

Memory to Legacy: Living with the Tragedies of 9/11

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Held (304 Barnard Hall) & Online
  • Add to Calendar 2021-09-12 17:00:00 2021-09-12 18:30:00 Memory to Legacy: Living with the Tragedies of 9/11 The Media Center will be hosting an event for the 20th anniversary of September 11th (in collaboration with the CEP and DEI Cabinet), titled "Memory to Legacy: Living with the Tragedies of 9/11," which will feature a screening and panel discussion from the HBO documentary In the Shadow of the Towers: Stuyvesant High on 9/11. This is the first event in a series that we will hold over the year that helps us think about 9/11—its antecedents and its legacies/consequences. Panelists include Thea Renda Abu El-Haj, J.C. Salyer, and Cathlin Goulding Register here to attend!   Panelist Bios Thea Renda Abu El-Haj, Professor and Chair of Education at Barnard College, Columbia University, is an anthropologist of education. Her research explores questions about belonging, rights, citizenship, and education raised by globalization, transnational migration, and conflict. She is currently working on two projects. In a recent publication, Fifi the punishing cat and other civic lessons from a Lebanese public kindergarten, in the Journal of Education in Emergencies, she and her colleagues write about their longitudinal collaborative ethnographic study of public kindergartens in Beirut, Lebanon, that focuses on questions of implicit civic education in conflict affected contexts. With the support of a Spencer Foundation grant, she is principal investigator of a US national interview study exploring the civic identities and civic practices of youth from Muslim immigrant communities. Her second book, Unsettled Belonging: Educating Palestinian American Youth after 9/11 (University of Chicago Press, 2015), won the 2016 American Educational Studies Association Critics Choice Award. J.C. Salyer, is an assistant professor of practice in anthropology and human rights and is the director of the human rights program at Barnard College, Columbia University. Salyer is also the staff attorney for the Arab-American Family Support Center, a community-based organization in Brooklyn, where he runs the organization's immigration clinic. Salyer’s recent book, Court of Injustice: Law Without Recognition in U.S. Immigration, combines anthropological and legal analysis to understand how U.S. immigration law operates and how immigrants and their attorneys navigate this often-hostile system. Additionally, Salyer has conducted ethnographic research on issues of migration, human rights, and sovereignty relating to the Australian government’s policy of placing asylum seekers in a detention center on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, and has co-edited a special journal section on the topic for the Contemporary Pacific. Prior to getting his Ph.D. in Anthropology, Salyer was a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and worked on the ACLU’s response to government actions taken in the wake of the 9/11 attacks.  Cathlin Goulding, Ed.D., is a curriculum specialist and researcher of place, pedagogy, and historical violence. From 2017-2019, she was an Andrew W. Mellon postdoctoral research fellow at the 9/11 Memorial & Museum. As the daughter and granddaughter of Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II, the history and reverberations of the concentration camp are key areas of research and writing. ​Currently, she co-directs YURI, an education project that offers curriculum, youth workshops, and teacher professional development on Asian American history and stories. She recently developed curriculum for the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery and to accompany two PBS series, The Asian Americans and American Masters. She teaches pre-service teachers at the City University of New York and San Jose State University.  Held (304 Barnard Hall) & Online Barnard College barnard-admin@digitalpulp.com America/New_York public

The Media Center will be hosting an event for the 20th anniversary of September 11th (in collaboration with the CEP and DEI Cabinet), titled "Memory to Legacy: Living with the Tragedies of 9/11," which will feature a screening and panel discussion from the HBO documentary In the Shadow of the Towers: Stuyvesant High on 9/11. This is the first event in a series that we will hold over the year that helps us think about 9/11—its antecedents and its legacies/consequences.

Panelists include Thea Renda Abu El-Haj, J.C. Salyer, and Cathlin Goulding

Register here to attend!

 

Panelist Bios


Thea Renda Abu El-Haj, Professor and Chair of Education at Barnard College, Columbia University, is an anthropologist of education. Her research explores questions about belonging, rights, citizenship, and education raised by globalization, transnational migration, and conflict. She is currently working on two projects. In a recent publication, Fifi the punishing cat and other civic lessons from a Lebanese public kindergarten, in the Journal of Education in Emergencies, she and her colleagues write about their longitudinal collaborative ethnographic study of public kindergartens in Beirut, Lebanon, that focuses on questions of implicit civic education in conflict affected contexts. With the support of a Spencer Foundation grant, she is principal investigator of a US national interview study exploring the civic identities and civic practices of youth from Muslim immigrant communities. Her second book, Unsettled Belonging: Educating Palestinian American Youth after 9/11 (University of Chicago Press, 2015), won the 2016 American Educational Studies Association Critics Choice Award.

J.C. Salyer, is an assistant professor of practice in anthropology and human rights and is the director of the human rights program at Barnard College, Columbia University. Salyer is also the staff attorney for the Arab-American Family Support Center, a community-based organization in Brooklyn, where he runs the organization's immigration clinic. Salyer’s recent book, Court of Injustice: Law Without Recognition in U.S. Immigration, combines anthropological and legal analysis to understand how U.S. immigration law operates and how immigrants and their attorneys navigate this often-hostile system. Additionally, Salyer has conducted ethnographic research on issues of migration, human rights, and sovereignty relating to the Australian government’s policy of placing asylum seekers in a detention center on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, and has co-edited a special journal section on the topic for the Contemporary Pacific. Prior to getting his Ph.D. in Anthropology, Salyer was a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and worked on the ACLU’s response to government actions taken in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. 

Cathlin Goulding, Ed.D., is a curriculum specialist and researcher of place, pedagogy, and historical violence. From 2017-2019, she was an Andrew W. Mellon postdoctoral research fellow at the 9/11 Memorial & Museum. As the daughter and granddaughter of Japanese Americans incarcerated during World War II, the history and reverberations of the concentration camp are key areas of research and writing. ​Currently, she co-directs YURI, an education project that offers curriculum, youth workshops, and teacher professional development on Asian American history and stories. She recently developed curriculum for the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery and to accompany two PBS series, The Asian Americans and American Masters. She teaches pre-service teachers at the City University of New York and San Jose State University.