Sep 10

Welcome Back Workshop: How to Use Computing Across Disciplines

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516 Milstein and Online
  • Add to Calendar 2021-09-10 12:00:00 2021-09-10 14:00:00 Welcome Back Workshop: How to Use Computing Across Disciplines Welcome back! The Vagelos Computational Science Center (CSC) is excited to kick off another series of computational workshops for the Fall 2021 semester. We begin with an exciting introductory workshop featuring Barnard faculty from across the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. Each presenter will give a 30-minute overview of how and why they use computation in their work. Topics and presenters include: Matching Algorithms in Economics, Rajiv Sethi, Professor of Economics Prof. Sethi will discuss how computing is used to solve matching problems in economics and beyond: matching buyers and sellers in financial markets, drivers and riders in ride-hailing apps, children and schools in systems with school choice, voters and candidates in ranked-choice elections, students and classes in colleges, kidney donors and recipients with compatible blood types, medical residents and hospitals, and people seeking life-partners with each other. Computational Sound, Mark Santolucito, Assistant Professor of Computer Science Prof. Santolucito develops techniques to provide programmers and non-programmers alike new ways to interface with code. To do this, his team of researchers works on the theory side to understand the nature of computation, and on the applications side to build program synthesis-enabled computer music tools. Spatializing Student Demographics, Erika Kitzmiller, Term Assistant Professor of Education Prof. Kitzmiller demonstrates how to use yearbook data and ancestry.com to create a database of student demographics from a Philadelphia high school. Participants will then consider how we could use GIS technologies to plot these demographic data points against citywide census data. Big Data from Small Cells, JJ Miranda, Assistant Professor Biology Prof. Miranda gives a brief overview of computational methods to study how populations of cancer cells behave like diverse individuals. Workshop participants are encouraged to follow along and ask questions! No prior experience in coding or computation is needed. This workshop is planned to take place in person (516 Milstein) and online. A link to join online will be sent to registrants shortly before the event. We look forward to seeing you there! 516 Milstein and Online Barnard College barnard-admin@digitalpulp.com America/New_York public

Welcome back! The Vagelos Computational Science Center (CSC) is excited to kick off another series of computational workshops for the Fall 2021 semester.

We begin with an exciting introductory workshop featuring Barnard faculty from across the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities. Each presenter will give a 30-minute overview of how and why they use computation in their work.

Topics and presenters include:

Matching Algorithms in Economics, Rajiv Sethi, Professor of Economics

Prof. Sethi will discuss how computing is used to solve matching problems in economics and beyond: matching buyers and sellers in financial markets, drivers and riders in ride-hailing apps, children and schools in systems with school choice, voters and candidates in ranked-choice elections, students and classes in colleges, kidney donors and recipients with compatible blood types, medical residents and hospitals, and people seeking life-partners with each other.


Computational Sound, Mark Santolucito, Assistant Professor of Computer Science

Prof. Santolucito develops techniques to provide programmers and non-programmers alike new ways to interface with code. To do this, his team of researchers works on the theory side to understand the nature of computation, and on the applications side to build program synthesis-enabled computer music tools.


Spatializing Student Demographics, Erika Kitzmiller, Term Assistant Professor of Education

Prof. Kitzmiller demonstrates how to use yearbook data and ancestry.com to create a database of student demographics from a Philadelphia high school. Participants will then consider how we could use GIS technologies to plot these demographic data points against citywide census data.


Big Data from Small Cells, JJ Miranda, Assistant Professor Biology

Prof. Miranda gives a brief overview of computational methods to study how populations of cancer cells behave like diverse individuals.


Workshop participants are encouraged to follow along and ask questions! No prior experience in coding or computation is needed.

This workshop is planned to take place in person (516 Milstein) and online. A link to join online will be sent to registrants shortly before the event. We look forward to seeing you there!